Doris Day GRAMMY Award 2008

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howard
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Unread post by howard »

Streisand has always been one of my favorites. "Funny Girl" is a classic film, and what a great performance! Although critics thought her to be too young for the "Dolly" part, I enjoyed her portrayal. That Mae West like delivery worked for me ... I found it to be hysterical!

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howard
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Unread post by howard »

I forgot to mention "What's Up Doc?," another classic comedy.

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Ralph
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Streisand

Unread post by Ralph »

I suppose it doesn't matter how many films you make, just look at James Dean. He was quickly elevated to "legendary" status. So strange about Heath Ledger. The autopsy report didn't reveal much, now they are saying he "died of natural causes." He was 28 years old!

I live in the East Village and he lived in SoHo, which is the next neighborhood down from me. It's within walking distance. John John Kennedy lived on Wooster Street too, I believe. There are a lot of loft apartments down there, where it used to be warehouses. It's quite chic to live in that area
now. Robert DeNiro, etc. all live in that neighborhood.

I can't bring myself to watch "Brokeback Mountain," right now. Ledger's performance was very touching and I think he and Jake Gyllenhaal should have won Oscars for that picture.

Back to Streisand. She was touted as being the next great musical star and make "many films." But, she was so difficult, she decided to direct herself and she made many enemies. She had major problems with William Wyler on "Funny Girl" when she started trying to tell him how to direct! Same with Gene Kelly on "Hello Dolly." Her crews (I read somewhere) didn't like her attitude either. I met her co-star from "Up The Sandbox" and he didn't want to discuss her. He was in "Sticks N Bones" with my friend Hector. What's his name? David Selby, that's it. I remember him spending a lot of time talking to soap opera people at the party that night, while I spent most of my time chatting with Elizabeth Wilson.

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Unread post by KarenSev »

Streisand is very much a perfectionist who has to have everything just right. She may be a pain in the butt, however, I think she has earned her way to be what ever she wants. Some people can get away with their eccentricities, and she is one of them. I really don't think she gives a hoot if she happens to make people mad with her likes and dislikes. Next to Doris, I think she has one of the best voices of our time.
Seeing her live at the MGM, I guess I am prejudiced. She was wonderful!
And so was El Divo.
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Ego

Unread post by Jas1 »

I am not doubting Streisand's talent etc but like Miss Day, I find such behaviour bad manners and out of order, no matter how 'big' someone is, or thinks they are! As Doris said, the bigger the star [to her] the less the ego [Gable, Cagney etc] & of course the same is true of Doris Day, and do you know, after the fabulous talent, the voice, the look, the compassion, [but not too far after] this is one of the things that I so love about Doris Day. To me bad behaviour / ego etc is just that whether someone is keeping the whole sound stage waiting, causing an absolute sotrm [for no artistic reason/ merit] or generally abusing power, [and it happens in all professions]; well I just do not appreciate it! I think the type of people who behave like this would do so if they were a manager in a factory as much as a superstar. If that behaviour is part of the person's make-up, that is the way they will be; pity!

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DORIS.... Streisand

Unread post by Doris Martin »

Hello Jas1.... I completly agre with you. Thankyou.Marti

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howard
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Unread post by howard »

I agree completely with you both. There's no excuse for that kind of behavior no matter what your status in life.

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Unread post by KarenSev »

Jas, your point is well taken. You are right in that Doris does not have that kind of ego, never did and never will. The difference is like night and DAY, no pun intended.
Doris has always had alot of grace in everything she does, while Striesand makes her demands known instantly.
However, I still love Streisand's voice. Doris is Number One in my book, regardless of my admiration for Barbra.
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Unread post by webmaster »

As far as Grammys are concerned, Bryan and I have two things to celebrate: Doris Day is being honored and our dear friend, Detroit diva, Bettye LaVette is nominated for Best Contemporary Blues Album ("The Scene of the Crime"). LaVette is up against Eric Clapton, but I'm hoping she beats him out.
This is a track from the album Bettye is being nominated for,
"Take Me As I Am":
Image
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aqU9t5BcyDY

Doris could be temperamental, don't portray her as a saint - there were problems with certain costars, Mamie van Doren, whom she ignored on "Teacher's Pet" Martha Hyer, who had to change her hair colour in "Lucky Me", Terry Thomas, who found her bossy and said she was telling him how to act in "Where Were You...", Cary Grant, who wanted, like Doris, to be photographed from the right on "That Touch of Mink". She got upset with Alfred Hitchcock on "The Man Who Knew Too Much" because she didn't get enough feedback. I could go on but my point is that she's human like the rest of us. Who doesn't sometimes get moody or annoyed about something sometimes? That's why I love Doris, she's human as well as being a great talent.
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Unread post by Jas1 »

Bryan I disagree, most [or all] of the instances you cite have never been verified by anyone other than those who state them. Of course Doris Day is human, of course she is not saint, however, she is not a spoiled badly behaved 'star' and never was! If she were, don't you think stories about someone of that magnitude would have surfaced before now? Did the likes of Mamie Van Doren ever comment about Doris' so called bad behaviour in all the years following TP =before she was plugging a book? I stand to be corrected but my view is the absolute lack of such stories about Doris Day speak volumes!
Finally [on this issue] 'even if the examples you state are true' [and we may never know] - if this is the most Doris Day did to upset others in a career that spanned decades and reached the heights most could only dream of; then in the movie world she is almost saintly!!!!!

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Unread post by webmaster »

I didn't say she was 'a spoiled badly behaved 'star', Jas.
From everything I've read and heard, she was easy to work with and practically eveyone who worked with her says she was a joy to work with.
We know she has a great sense of fun, is very intelegent and sensitive.
All I'm saying is it sounds like she could still occasionally be a diva - and why not? She was the world's top star for many many years.

I don't know if you've seen "I Don't Even Like Apple Pie" but I remember thinking half way though, "I bet she could be a diva!". I just think it limits her if you say that in real life she was still always 'the girl next door'.
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Unread post by Jas1 »

Bryan,

1- I did not say you labelled Doris a 'spoilt brat star'.
2- My post was in relation to your comment - 'dont' paint Doris as some sort of saint'- or similar words. I was not & am not. Doris Day herself admits in her own book to having an affair with a married man and basically not giving a hoot as the issue of breach of trust was his, not hers! Hardly 'saintly' but once again this is juct a facet of a woman I adore on all levels.
3- I have seen 'I don't even like Apple Pie' many times and never got that impression of Doris. Sure she was annoyed and it was obvious when she was talking about the untruth Mamie Van Doren wrote about in her book, proof again, she is not trying in any way to portray anything other than a natural [albeit a superstar] lady with a lot of class who is honest with her reactions/ opinions.

What I was saying in previous posts is Dors was first & foremost professional - yes the incident with Cary Grant occurred but if he had not graciously given in, I have no doubt Doris Day would not have stormed off the film causing it to be shut down until her demands were met.

I love reading about diva behaviour but I do not condone it, [as previously stated]. Some of the stories about Bette Davis,Crawford, Turner and many more I find amusing and it doesn't detract from my admiration for their talent. However, I would not like to be dealing with such behaviour, and in life I really do believe in the moto 'treat others as you would like to be treated'- sure we [I included, and perhaps DorisDay too] don't always get it right, but believe me,. I don't equate manners & profesionalism with a boring person,or a squeaky clean persona.

Finally, it is strange how even indirectly Doris Day can help a person. I remember just after I read Doris'book for the first time [around 1984] - I was having lunch with my sister telling her all about Doris' life and how it was not the life any of us thought she had had. I also told the story about the affair with the married man and how Doris felt about this. It wasn't until many years later that my sister confided in me at that time she [single] was having an affair with a married man and was having a tough time with guilt etc. She said that just hearing how Doris dealt with this really helped her and as it happened, the affair [for her] did not last much longer. Now, on a final note, I am not condoning affairs etc, but I do agree with Doris' philosopy in the circumstances she was in.

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Unread post by webmaster »

I wish I hadn't said anything now!
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Unread post by Jas1 »

Bryan, I could never imagine you being silent and of course wouldn't want you to be. What is good is that we can all have our views on the wonderful Miss Day, who unites us all when all is said and done; don't you agree?

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Unread post by webmaster »

Yes, I agree Jas. I think we all see Doris in our own special way - right or wrong. That fact that we all love her is what matters, and as you say, that is what unites us.
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Unread post by John M »

Everybody has their personality quirks, and many celebs have A LOT of them! :lol:

To comment a bit about what was said re: Barbra earlier: take alot of what you hear about Streisand with a grain of salt. I have a fair amount of personal knowledge about this. She is not quite like many people love to portray her. Many of the people who work with her have done so for years, both in her personal life, and professionally. Decades, in some cases. She can be very tough and no-nonsense and tunnel-visioned, but she's not the tempramental diva throwing tantrums right and left that you hear about. Take the story about Willy Wyler that Ralph referred to. That's been going around for years. But in reality, they got along fine on Funny Girl and remained friends until his death. Shortly before he died he wrote her a letter and gave it to his wife to give Barbra when she began production on Yentl. It was a letter of encouragement and advice to help as she began her first directing assignment. Most of the time it's the wanna-be's and the lesser-knowns who fuel these kinds of stories.

And I could tell you horrendous stories about a TRUE diva, a supreme singer from the 60's who really does behave the way people say Barbra does. But I won't! :wink: But trust me, this "lady" can make many people sing the blues...
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Unread post by webmaster »

I'd love to hear some stories about Diana Ross. :lol:
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Unread post by dayniac »

I happened to see Diana Ross in concert after Lady Sings the Blues period. I liked her BEFORE the concert. Talk about an ego trip ! It wasn't so much a concert as a lecture entitled - "let me tell you how you should conduct your life based on my vast experience." She even went so far as to tell people getting up and leaving to sit down - she was talking ! It wasn't a nice experience. She's definitely a diva !
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Grammy

Unread post by webmaster »

We were treated to a taste of it as well:

"Diana Ross Released And Given Warning After Her Arrest
For Allegedly Assaulting Female Officer At London Airport":

http://findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_m ... i_57042494

Maybe she deserves a Diva Grammy? :lol:
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Ralph
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Day Is Human

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Personally, I hate it when people portray Doris Day as some type of a "flake." That she was totally "la de da" and "didn't care" about such things as billing on her films, that she didn't have any "diva" qualities, etc. Ridiculous! When you are that big of a star, you have to let people know they cannot run over you.

From the way some people describe Doris, you'd think that when she arrived at CBS to start her TV series, that if they had an old closet set up, she'd have not cared because she didn't get a huge trailor with flowers, picket fences, private bathroom facilities, etc. "Oh, Doris didn't care about those things, they could have put her anywhere." Ridiculous! Likewise, I've heard, "she didn't care where her name was, she didn't care anything about billing, etc." Also, ridiculous.

Can you imagine the #1 female movie star arriving at CBS (Lucille Ball's home) and getting a smaller trailor? Doris would NOT have stood for that. But Terry was making all arrangements and probably told them what he expected for his mother. This saved Doris from pitching a b**ch.

In Mamie Van Doren's book, she said that Doris acted "cold, like a spoiled movie queen." It probably looked that way to Van Doren -- Day thought Mamie was vulgar. I also read that Doris ignored Elizabeth Montgomery at dinner with Gig Young and other people. Nothing was made of it, but it was mentioned.

Look, I've seen how horrible Lauren Bacall can be to people who just say "hello" to her on the streets of New York -- she ignores them. A good source told me that Alex Baldwin is "haughty" and ignores "hellos" on public streets. I can't blame them, but New Yorkers usually don't bother famous people. They see them and keep walking.

Famous people live is most neighborhoods in Manhattan, so people see them all the time. Most find it easier to smile, nod and keep walking instead of being rude and totally ignoring folks.

Back to Doris: huge stars don't usually have to ask for much, it's expected that they will get A-1 treatment wherever they go: the best seats at the concerts, suites in hotels, etc.

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Unread post by John M »

Ralph, I think you hit the nail on the head: Doris had agents, then Marty, then Terry to handle the "messier" ends of the deals and look after her interests. I think when people say "she doesn't care about those things" what they mean is they may have been a little less important to Doris herself than to Marty, but of course Doris could afford that attitude in that she HAD Marty to handle those things.

In her book, you could tell from the way she described how much she hated Golden West Studios, where the first season of her series was filmed, and how she loved CBS Studio City, where the other four seasons were filmed. She went on about how at the new studio she had 2 dressing rooms, redecorated to her specifications, etc. Obviously, those things were important to her.

But I still maintain if she had cared as much about billing and things as Marty, there is no way Rock Hudson would have gotten billing over her in their final 2 films together. The ONLY way he would get billing over the world's #1 screen star at the time is if she allowed it.
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Unread post by jmichael »

Regarding Ralph's comment on Lauren Bacall.

I lived in Chicago at the time she was doing the road tour of "Woman of the Year" and saw her at the annual auto show at McCormick Place convention center. Knowing her reputation, I did not dare approach when I spotted her admiring a sparkling new Mercedes. But one unfortunate young lady did and immediately received a curt dismissal. One wave of the hand and an abrupt "I don't sign autographs!!!" was all it took to send the poor girl running for cover. I respect Bacall as an actress but I don't think she is a very gracious human being. She was probably still pI%%#@ that Raquel Welch stole her thunder on Broadway. LOL

I also see a big difference in Diana Ross and Streisand. The former strikes me as petty and completely self-centered, while Streisand seems determined, serious and strictly business.

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Unread post by c.j »

Hi did'nt she have a picket fence and faux grass and a cool (SET) set up at CBS studio? Anyway I fiqure Ms. Day just was not petty and she did'nt allow things to bother her also she was trusting..

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Unread post by KarenSev »

Didn't I read somewhere that Doris and Lauren Bacall did not get along at all in the "Young Man With A Horn?"
Perhaps Ms. Bacall was always self absorbed in herself. Too bad, because I think she is a good actress.
Regarding Mamie Van Doren, wasn't she a bit of an airhead? It would seem to me Clara would have no time for people with half a brain.

Speaking of which, I know Clara does have a habit of being rude to people who are dumb regarding the care of their animals. There was an incident the day I first met her, where she let a woman in the restaurant know she was not pleased with her because of a nasty reference she made regarding the four leggers. I was surprised at the time, but then was proud of her for making a stand with a woman who had no clue how special dogs and cats are. I don't think the woman even understood what hit her.
These days, I find myself doing the same thing. I can't tolerate abuse or anyone I find mistreating a pet. When people ask where did my love for animals come from, I tell them, "I was taught by a very good teacher."
"I'm looking for the Rainbow's End, my friend."

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Ralph
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Billing

Unread post by Ralph »

KarenSev, you can delete the repeat post, but only you can if you are logged in.
_____________________________________________________

Hollywood is filled with wanna be "stars." They want to be like the legendary movie stars like Errol Flynn, Clark Gable, Jean Harlow and James Stewart.

Movie stars are only valuable if they are BOX OFFICE. Without that, they are released from their contracts (at least during the hey day in Tinseltown). When Doris Day became a boxoffice star, she had arrived. Along with that status came priviledges: high salaries and prestige.

Billing is almost mathematical. When Rock Hudson and Doris Day appeared in "Pillow Talk," HE was #1 at the boxoffice and Doris wasn't even on the list. She needed that picture to save her career. So, she allowed his name to preceed hers.

Frankly, I cannot understand why she allowed his name to go before hers in their subsequent films because she was #1 and he had faltered. I wish I had an answer. You will notice that she allowed James Stewart, Cary Grant and Clark Gable to get top billing over her, but that was because of her respect for their careers. She did not, however allow Rex Harrison, Louis Jourdan, Frank Sinatra, Richard Widmark, David Niven or Jack Lemmon to get billing over her.

If she had made a film with Tony Curtis, Gregory Peck, Charlton Heston, William Holden or Paul Newman, she would have insisted on top billing. Her boxoffice was powerful and the studios knew it. SHE was, as LIFE MAGAZINE described her, "Box Office Bonanza." Doris Day's name was bringing millions into the theatres - world-wide.

I was really surprised when she allowed Stephen Boyd, James Garner and Rod Taylor to get equal billing with her. She even allowed Robert Morse equal billing, but not Peter Graves. She accepted sole star billing in "Ballad of Josie" and her billing with Howard Keel and Robert Cummings was "slightly favoring her."

Studios do the "math." "You allowed Jack's name to go before yours but you won't allow Jim's?" "Your last three films were flops and he's #3 at the boxoffice for the last two years..his name has to go first." That is argued and discussed in every film.

Doris knew that if she had accepted Peter Graves as equal billing, it would reduce her importance to that of a TV star. At least Robert Morse was a proven Broadway star! Just think, if Day had allowed Rex Harrison's name to go before hers, that would make her less important than Elizabeth Taylor! Day would not have accepted second/equal billing to Richard Burton, I'll bet you. Nor would she accept second/equal billing to Elvis Presley.

Day KNEW this business, she was no fool. Billing means MONEY.

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