This and that...

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Rate your favourite Doris Day period

Band Singer
0
No votes
Film period 1: (1950s) Romance on the High Seas (1948) - Pillow Talk (1959)
6
100%
Film period 2: (1960s) Please Don’t Eat the Daisies (1960) - With Six You Get Eggroll (1968)
0
No votes
TV period, The Doris Day Show (1968 - !973)
0
No votes
Post-film period: The Doris Day Animal Foundation
0
No votes
 
Total votes: 6

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This and that...

Unread post by webmaster » 10 Apr 2018, 06:40

For topics that don't easily fit into existing categories or may not warrant a topic to themselves.


Doris Day and Stephen Boyd

Image

I first saw Jumbo on TV in the 1990s and was struck by the charisma between the two stars. There was a real spark, especially when Doris sang 'My Romance' to him. So I was disappointed when a romance was denied by both! But they would say that, wouldn't they!

So I was very interested to come across an article called 'Stephen Boyd talks about Doris Day' on a blog I've visited before: This is part of what he had to say:

“Doris has a beautiful figure and a wonderful mouth and eyes. She dresses beautifully and she’s full of life… I never enjoyed making a picture so much in my life as with Doris.”

“I’m amazed at her versatility,” he says,”I think Doris could do any kind of drama as well as if not better than an anyone else I’ve ever worked with. She gives so much."

Apparently, his admiration was reciprocated in kind, and for a while, there was a romance rumor swirling about concerning Boyd and Day. According to the gossip columnist Earl Wilson, this is what happened on the set of “Jumbo”.

It started when Doris- seldom interested in love scenes- enjoyed rehearsing the kissing clinches with Steve, then insisted on more and MORE rehearsals…I checked the love scene rumor with Producer Jose Pasternak who said, “Yes, when the director said ‘Cut’ during a kiss, they didn’t cut!”

Even the below movie add in February of 1963 was trying to capitalize on the rumor!

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Read More: https://stephenboydblog.com/2016/04/03/ ... doris-day/

It doesn't really matter if they did have a romance or if they didn't, of course, it's such a long time ago, just a bit of fun and I'm sure you'll all be pleased to read of the high esteem he held Doris in. 8)

More on the making of Jumbo:
https://stephenboydblog.com/2018/01/12/ ... s-maximus/
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Re: This and that...

Unread post by webmaster » 11 Apr 2018, 05:45

Whoops! Just saw that Howard already posted on this - but I'm coming from a slightly different angle and there are links to read more.

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Warner Bros: The Making of an American Movie Studio
By David Thomson / Narrated By David Thomson

I've been listening to an interesting new audiobook about the history of Warner Bros by writer and film historian, David Thomson.

And I thought I'd share two short sections (4min and 3mins approx) in which he talks about her:

Doris Day as a contract player at Warner Bros mp3
https://drive.google.com/open?id=1sH4bh ... 7vNv8L2CHb

It starts by talking about Lauren Bacall and leads into 'Young Man With A Horn' and Doris.
I'm not sure about 'Embraceable You' being her record hit that inspired people during the war - wasn't that Sentimental Journey?

Comments on Day & Cagney in 'Love Me or Leave Me' mp3
https://drive.google.com/file/d/1S5Fvo8 ... sp=sharing

You can get the audiobook here and it's also available as a book on Amazon and elsewhere - Recommended.
https://www.audible.co.uk/pd/Film-Radio ... B07BMGMTRG
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Re: This and that...

Unread post by jmichael » 11 Apr 2018, 11:21

Take this with a grain but ...

I'm pretty sure Boyd was gay. Maybe not 100%, as in Liberace or Billy DeWolfe gay, but mostly that way. I can easily see Doris forming a crush on him though and that he would be flattered. And tempted. This was not a good time for her marriage with Marty. I believe they were separated then. Could be that sparks were flying.

A few years ago, I attended a tribute to Raquel Welch at the Film Society of Lincoln Center in NYC. She outed Boyd in her remarks about working him. She recounted that she tried to seduce him when they were promoting Fantastic Voyage in New York. She invited him up to her hotel room for a nightcap but he declined, saying, "Thanks, but I can't and I hope you can understand what I mean by this. An actress is a bit more than a woman, but an actor is a bit less than a man." He told her that John Geiguld (openly gay) told him that when they worked together on the London stage. Welch was convinced he was gay, but then again, she was rejected. So this may be her way of saving face. Who knows?

Great info, Bryan.... personally, all things considered, I hope they enjoyed a little on-set fling.

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Re: This and that...

Unread post by webmaster » 11 Apr 2018, 12:57

Thanks, Michael,

From what I've read I get the impression that he might have been 'both', as they say. He was married a couple of times - the first one only lasted three weeks! He was involved with many women, according to Wikipedia, but not always romantically and he mostly seemed to be the one being chased!

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stephen_B ... sonal_life

Although they say there is no evidence that he was gay. Perhaps he just didn't fancy Raquel! :) Although I think he did with Doris!

The quote '...but an actor is a bit less than a man' is intriguing.
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Re: This and that...

Unread post by Jas1 » 11 Apr 2018, 15:26

I agree Michael.

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Re: This and that...

Unread post by Musiclover » 12 Apr 2018, 20:17

Just came across short accounts connected with these films:

"An Affair to Remember" -- Doris was offered the lead, but turned it down. (Based on its mid-1957 release date, it probably went into production soon after she had finished making 3 dramas in a row. If so, I suspect that she was more than ready to shoot "Pajama Game" instead.)

"The Graduate" -- A Vanity Fair article from a decade ago told about how various people were cast in the movie, including that producer Mike Nichols had wanted Brian Keith for the role of Mr. Robinson . . . but Keith turned down the role after reading the script, calling it "the biggest piece of s**t" he'd ever read.

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Re: This and that...

Unread post by webmaster » 13 Apr 2018, 04:06

That's interesting, Judy. I saw some of 'An Affair to Remember' on TV and thought it was a bit slow and switched channels but it would have been again interesting with Doris in it, I did a quick search for it and was surprised to read how popular it was, so maybe it would have been a good choice for Doris - but not at the expense of turning down The Pajama Game'!

'An Affair to Remember': 25 Things You Didn't Know About the Classic Romance:
https://www.moviefone.com/2012/07/10/an ... niversary/

Did you get a chance to listen to the audio above from the book 'Warner Bros: The Making of an American Movie Studio'?
Doris Day as a contract player at Warner Bros mp3
https://drive.google.com/file/d/1sH4bhw ... L2CHb/view

I wondered what you thought about 'Embraceable You' being her record hit that inspired people during the war - was that a bigger hit than Sentimental Journey?
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Re: This and that...

Unread post by jmichael » 13 Apr 2018, 07:47

I've always felt An Affair To Remember was overrated. The blazing star power of Cary Grant and the intelligent sensitivity of Deborah Kerr made it work, but the storyline was overly sentimental and manipulative IMO. Doris would have been wonderful though. She had the emotional depth to make audiences weep.

The Graduate represented a major shift in pop culture away from mainstream thinking to anti-establishment and counter culture trends. Brian Keith, like Doris and Marty, for that matter, was a traditionalist and rather modest by nature. No wonder the script was offensive to him. We can look back at The Graduate now and think how tame it was, but then the idea of an older woman seducing a much younger man - the boyfriend of her daughter, no less - was deemed racy. I can easily see Brian Keith objecting to the script's savage satire of middle class culture at the time. Had Mike Nichols been able to sit down and talk about what the film meant to him and what Buck Henry's script was saying, Doris might have gone against Marty and taken a leap. Then again, maybe not, because she clearly stated in her book that it offended her values.

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Re: This and that...

Unread post by webmaster » 13 Apr 2018, 08:52

Thanks, Michael, for those insights. Perhaps Doris reacted to the predatory nature of Mrs. Robinson? Had she done it, it would have stood out as the one film in which her character was not very nice and somewhat ruthless.

It's hard to imagine her seducing a college boy in a film. She never promoted her sex-appeal in the way that Talyor and Monroe did. She was more of a Grace Kelly, Audrey Hepburn type. I was going to say, Deborah Kerr, who was always seen as 'a lady', and then remembered her on the beach with Burt Lancaster in From Here To Eternity. A successful playing-against-type performance. Although her character wasn't 'immoral' in the way that Mrs. Robinson's was - willing to use her daughter's boyfriend behind her back for sexual gratification.

As Stephen Boyd said, 'Doris could play anything' so she could have done it. But you can't blame her for not wanting to. :)
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Re: This and that...

Unread post by Musiclover » 13 Apr 2018, 11:55

Bryan and Michael, your comments about An Affair to Remember and The Graduate reflect what I think as well.

Yes, I listened to those audios. (At first I thought it was Alfred Hitchcock talking!) Several things Thomson said in the one about Doris as a Warner's contract player jumped out at me: It is incorrect that she was with Les Brown for 10 years. Also, as you noted, Bryan, it was "Sentimental Journey" that was the big hit of 1945. I don't know how any writer who is a good researcher could've misidentified the song title. (Several singers, including Billie Holiday, made wartime recordings of "Embraceable You," but Doris wasn't one of them.) Those are facts that Thomson got wrong, but I would also dispute two of his opinions.

Putting "I'll See You in My Dreams" in the same category as what he calls Doris's "lightweight musicals" is inexplicable to me. That description fits a lot of her WB films, but ISYIMD is far from lightweight. Also, I disagree that the studio "encouraged Doris to make fun of the proceedings [in musicals] without ever revealing that she could be funny." Has Thomson ever even watched those musicals? Her comedic talent was huge right from the beginning in ROTHS and was showcased in most of her subsequent musicals. I rest my case!

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Re: This and that...

Unread post by webmaster » 14 Apr 2018, 07:38

Well, you certainly listen, Judy (you must be a great person to talk to :) ) He does sound gruff but I know he's an admirer of Doris - https://www.dorisday.net/the-cutest-blonde/ so I can forgive him a lot.
(I was trying to get David Kaufman to publish his Doris book in audio, the only thing available is a short mini-book explaining the basic facts (I imagine), while her peers have tons of books about them. His partner died soon after I mentioned it so I didn't want to bother him with it then but I could mention it again.)

I didn't hear that David Thomson said that she was with Les Brown for 10 years. But I read she'd made 'With Eight You Get Eggroll' in a mention of her films the other day! I agree with your comment about 'lightweight musicals', You couldn't say that about Young Man With A Horn' or, as you say, I’ll See You in my Dreams - wasn't that the film that Martin Scorsese said had influenced him?

True, a lot of her films were made for pure entertainment and nothing wrong with that. On Moonlight Bay/By the Light of the Silvery Moon were lightweight on the surface but underneath explained a lot about America to others, in the way that Ealing films explain a lot about the UK!

I suppose if you're writing a book you have to adopt a position but I think that generally, he was being very positive about her, although, after what you've said, I think he could have spent more time on her. There's an awful lot about Betty Davis, a whole chapter and more and it occurs to me that the main difference is that Betty ''suffered for her art' and Doris, generally, made it look easy and only occasionally ventured into Davis' territory, as in Julie, a part you could imagine Davis playing. So Doris, was in many ways, more versatile than Betty! :mrgreen:
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Re: This and that...

Unread post by webmaster » 14 Apr 2018, 08:06

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Re: This and that...

Unread post by jmichael » 14 Apr 2018, 08:31

Doris' biggest sin was making it look so easy. That is a sure ticket to the land of underrated talent when people start talk about serious acting ability. The WB musicals placed a distant second to the lavish MGM musical extravaganzas and that didn't help Doris either. Jack Warner produced them to make money and he relied on her to draw crowds at the box-office, but I don't think he cared much about developing her talent or finding challenging roles for her. He had a bankable star and a proven formula. Why mess with it?

Bryan, Scorsese cited My Dream Is Yours as the inspiration for New York, New York.

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Re: This and that...

Unread post by webmaster » 16 Apr 2018, 04:10

Bryan, Scorsese cited My Dream Is Yours as the inspiration for New York, New York.
Thanks for that, Michael, will have to watch it again.

Not many votes in the poll so far (4) but all voted for films in the mostly-1950s rather than the 1960s, 1970s, etc.
Doris said about her Warner Bros years:
In those Warner Brothers years, the pictures I enjoyed the most (not the scripts but the fun I had making them) were the nostalgic musicals, Tea For Two, Lullaby of Broadway, On Moonlight Bay, I’ll See You in My Dreams, By the Light of the Silvery Moon, Calamity Jane. I liked the old songs and the good old times that those films captured.

I guess I’m really an old-fashioned girl at heart, even though I look so contemporary that I always seemed misplaced in those period costumes.” – Doris Day, Her Own Story
Image

Could she mean as in the dress above? Or below? :lol:

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It's a Great Feeling
https://www.dorisday.net/its-a-great-feeling/
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Re: This and that...

Unread post by jmichael » 17 Apr 2018, 06:04

Doris made some excellent films in the first half of the sixties but the the second half was inconsistent. Overall, her best films and performances were in the 1950’s. You didn’t see the range of films or the high caliber of directors and scripts toward the end of her film career.

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Re: This and that...

Unread post by webmaster » 17 Apr 2018, 06:58

True, Michael. :)
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Re: This and that...

Unread post by Jas1 » 17 Apr 2018, 11:23

I agree Michael- the period 1953 - 1960 - were Doris' best artistically - what amazing work [films and recordings] she did during this time.

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Re: This and that...

Unread post by jmichael » 18 Apr 2018, 08:08

Doris Day: A Sentimental Journey

https://www.amazon.com/Doris-Day-Sentim ... is+day+dvd

If you've never seen the 1991 PBS documentary on Doris, this new DVD is a must have item. It includes two noteworthy Bonus Features: her full length interview w/ Merv Griffin from 1976, which I had only seen a portion of before, and an entire episode of the Doris Day Show from 1968. That one is especially interesting because it was the only episode written by James L. Brooks who went on to write, produce and direct landmark series like The Mary Tyler Moore Show, Rhoda and Lou Grant in addition to major feature films such as Terms Of Endearment, Broadcast News and As Good As It Gets. You can tell the difference in the quality of the writing. Doris rises to the occasion with a very sensitive performance. I just wish they had hired him to write more episodes.

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Re: This and that...

Unread post by Jas1 » 18 Apr 2018, 09:53

Bryan- re- your question about the costumes- the one you refer to in the pic above is a contemporary outfit [for the time]- so is not in the category DD was referring to. Although Doris has stated that she hated her early WB clothes full stop! She said towards the end of her contract she had some say and used the likes of Howard Shoup = Lucky me/ Young at heart - who she wore off screen too. Personally, I really liked how Doris looked/dressed in her first 3 WB films.

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Re: This and that...

Unread post by Musiclover » 18 Apr 2018, 11:46

Thanks for the DVD info, Michael. Nice discovery.

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Re: This and that...

Unread post by webmaster » 18 Apr 2018, 12:19

Yes, thanks for that, Michael - and thanks for your info too, Jas. :)

Also, the Thrill of it All has just come out on Blu-Ray:

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https://www.amazon.com/Thrill-All-Blu-r ... ll+blu+ray
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Re: This and that...

Unread post by jmichael » 18 Apr 2018, 12:57

I forgot to add that you can also order the DVD from the DDAF website.

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Re: This and that...

Unread post by webmaster » 18 May 2018, 06:21

I was surprised and amused to hear Doris sing "It's Harry I'm Planning To Marry" from Calamity Jane (she didn't sing it in the film but it's on the soundtrack) on a TV promotion last night for the wedding of Prince Harry and Meghan Markle on Saturday at Windsor. :D

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Re: This and that...

Unread post by jmichael » 18 May 2018, 08:20

A clever choice. Doris might as well get in on the promotional bandwagon since this has become a worldwide media sensation.

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Re: This and that...

Unread post by Jas1 » 20 May 2018, 11:34

Bryan, sorry I missed that- I often wondered if they would ever use that for anything to do with Harry getting married.

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