Chatting about Doris...

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Re: Chatting about Doris...

Unread post by webmaster »

How about this for a review of Pillow Talk? :)

Pillow Talk (1959) Universal Pictures
"Any movie with Doris Day is boring, that is if you can tell the difference between any of them. It’s pretty much all the same plot lines with the same terrible acting."
—rebeccal4ce5906a2

:D :D :D

I came across this - it's quite funny. I even agree about It's a Wonderful Life, I can't bear to watch it!

We asked the BuzzFeed Community to tell us the most overrated Old Hollywood movie of all time. Here are the controversial results.

The Graduate (1967) Embassy Pictures
"It's just... bad. The story is all over the place, the acting isn't really all that great, and the ending is just stupid. I watched it once quite a while ago and was unimpressed."
—a43920c533

Gone with the Wind (1939) MGM
"Scarlett O'Hara is spoiled, selfish, and self-absorbed, and Rhett Butler is a f*ckboy. Yes they're made for each other, but mainly to keep them from poisoning the general population."
—a4e923f2c7

Mary Poppins (1964) Disney
"I've never really understood the hype around Mary Poppins."
—bluejaynic

Breakfast at Tiffany's (1961) Paramount Pictures
"This movie glorifies racist stereotypes, organized crime, child marriage, and utter inauthenticity. I also hate to say this because she was utterly lovely to look at, but Audrey Hepburn’s performance is completely unbelievable. It’s a bad, bad movie."
—chrisa443ec9017

The Wizard of Oz (1939) MGM
"I don’t know why, but I've always found something awful about The Wizard of Oz. I don’t think it’s that great."
—elmobeth

Casablanca (1942) Warner Bros. Pictures
"This movie is SO boring and overrated. I had to watch it for my film history class, and then I found myself rewatching it three separate times because I kept falling asleep!"
—alyssanbadger

West Side Story (1961) United Artists
"West Side Story doesn't bring anything interesting to the table. It's just another Romeo and Juliet movie and I’m frankly sick of movies using that trope."
—eastocean

Rebel Without a Cause (1955) Warner Bros. Pictures
"The acting is terrible in Rebel Without a Cause and James Dean is very overrated."
—lizb4d657e1c9

All About Eve (1950) 20th Century Fox
"I've heard for years this movie is incredible, chilling and thrilling, and then I watched it and found an utterly lifeless, dull movie. Absolutely nothing happened in this movie at all. It was frankly one of the most boring movies I've ever seen."
—mattyc3

The Seven Year Itch (1955) 20th Century Fox
"I love Marilyn Monroe, but this movie is just truly awful. It's incredibly boring and the main character’s paranoia and conversations with himself really ruined the plot for me."
—kylies4ba2f7572

It's a Wonderful Life (1946) RKO Radio Pictures
"I love old Christmas movies, but I can't stand It's a Wonderful Life. It's a schmaltzy piece of mediocre film that's somehow managed to get classified as something no one is allowed to criticize. If you want your Jimmy Stewart fix at Christmas time, I recommend watching The Shop Around the Corner instead."
—killiandiggins

The Birds (1963) Universal Pictures
"The Birds is tedious to the point of boredom for most of its runtime. If you take out all the long, dialogue-less scenes of driving, parking, and walking from the freshly parked car to the next shot, this movie would be like 20 minutes long."
—michelem14

A Streetcar Named Desire (1951) Warner Bros. Pictures
“A Streetcar Named Desire is about an abusive relationship that has been glorified as a passionate romance for decades. Brando’s character is abusive to both his love interest and her sister, and when I first saw it in my twenties, I was stunned that it’s lauded as this great film. No thanks."
—lilsooz4

Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs (1937) Disney
"This movie is overrated as hell. People only defend it today as The Greatest Movie of All Time because it’s old and for no other reason. Disney gets away with milking it incessantly to people who miss being eight."
—thisisawesomehere

Rosemary's Baby (1968) Paramount Pictures
"Rosemary’s Baby is just hours of lackluster content with no real storyline. I found it very boring and the end was a disaster."
—rachaelh4463f4cfa

Citizen Kane (1941) RKO Radio Pictures
"People say Citizen Kane is the greatest film of all time, but I think it’s incredibly boring. The characters are flat and very detached. It’s just really hard to connect with them."
—amandac4df3751d9

Roman Holiday (1953) Paramount Pictures
"I’m a big Audrey Hepburn fan so I was excited to watch it, but it honestly just isn’t worth the hype for me and certainly isn’t Audrey’s best movie. I think it's kinda dull and unemotional, like, literally all they do is go around Rome???"
—seasonofthewitch

An American in Paris (1951) MGM
"I know it’s supposed to be an amazing old classic, but I got so bored watching it. On top of that, none of the songs are good!"
—delaneygreczyn

Rear Window (1954) Paramount Pictures
"The plot moves slowly and doesn’t create enough suspense, and the climactic end scene falls flat. It's a big disappointment."
—hillerhannah94

https://www.buzzfeed.com/kaylayandoli/2 ... -overrated
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Re: Chatting about Doris...

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Some of the comments in this collection are indeed quite funny, Bryan! I like Jimmy Stewart, but tend to agree with you about "It's a Wonderful Life."

As far as the comment that none of the songs in "An American in Paris" is any good -- holy cow! They're some of the most time-tested compositions of the entire century . . . but maybe the writer just doesn't like Gershwin music.

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Re: Chatting about Doris...

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Unbelievable! There's not a clunker in this list. Just great films ... with one exception. I too am not a fan of "It's a Wonderful Life." I've never been able to get through it. After having read this, I sent a retort mentioning "Love Me or Leave Me," "Calamity Jane" and "The Thrill of it All," all of which, I don't think he's ever seen.
Like Irene Dunne done.

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Re: Chatting about Doris...

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I wonder if the BuzzFeed Community people who made these curious observations on these films being overrated thought about them within the context of the time they were made. Do these people appreciate Hollywood history? Are they film aficinados? The films listed were made between 1937 to 1968. Many film critics agree that 1939, the year Gone With The Wind was released is the best year in movie history.

For most people films are emotional and intellectually engaging experiences. In the 1930's and 1940's movie attendance was at it's peak. With the arrival of television, movie attendance declined.

The films and actors listed have made an indelible and positive mark on Hollywood history.imprint.

Perhaps these films were watched on television at home with numerous distractions. Perhaps these people who made the comments prefer Arnold Schwarzenegger movies.

I do take exception to the dismissive comments on Doris Day films as thoughtless. Perhaps the people who made th comments do not know Doris Day has the distinction of being the only female number one box office star in the world from 1960-1964.

It is probable that our culture of cynicism has changing values has contributed to the lack of appreciation for the films and actors mentioned.

No movie experience compares to seeing a film in a movie theater sharing the experience with other people. Paul made some excellent observations on seeing Doris' film Where Were You When The Lights Went Out? as a delightful shared experience.

In today's entertainment culture, many films have become minimal throw -away experience with little value.

Our lives are so much more enjoyable for all the films, domestic and foreign, that have been created by outstanding talents in front and behind the camera.

Last night I watched Barbara Stanwyck , Dennis Morgan, Sydney Greenstreet, and S.Z. Sakall in the 1945 film, Christmas in Connecticut. It is a bright, funny and charming film that continues to inspire great joy for today:'s audience. I contend this same feeling can be attributed to any Doris Day film.
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Re: Chatting about Doris...

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Yes, the music and dancing in "An American in Paris" is wonderful, Judy! Especially the number where Gene Kelly and others march over a bridge.
I wouldn't worry about the criticism of Doris films, Howard, I think they must all be quite young as they use the word 'bored' a lot! :)
My favourite criticism was:
Roman Holiday (1953) Paramount Pictures
"I’m a big Audrey Hepburn fan so I was excited to watch it, but it honestly just isn’t worth the hype for me and certainly isn’t Audrey’s best movie. I think it's kinda dull and unemotional, like, literally all they do is go around Rome???"
:lol: (Haven't seen Roman Holiday.)
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Re: Chatting about Doris...

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Consider the source: Buzzfeed is a digital news outlet that was started in 2006, so I’m betting their readers are mostly Millennials and Gen Z-ers, whose idea of a classic film is Avatar or The Martian. There are a lot complaints about the films being dull, slow or boring, which tells me the respondents are digital junkies whose attention spans measure in nano seconds. Of course, they’re not going to tolerate long takes, monologues or verbose scripts that favor language and character development over action and jump cuts. The mere idea that cinema existed before the invention of CGI is a foreign concept to them. I mean, why would anyone pay good money to watch a film in which people merely talk, argue, suffer or fall in love when they can get all that by binge-watching reality television?

Harrrummmmph....someone reading this might think I’m a disgruntled old fogey.

Guilty, as charged.

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Re: Chatting about Doris...

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Michael, I really appreciate your insightful perspective.

I wonder how many BuzzFeed individuals have left their sofas to go and see a film in a movie theater.

Can they define the meaning of "classic film".

One definition I have found:

"Classic films are films that are of lasting worth or timeless quality". They are well -made with great acting, music and dialogue...Classic films are believable...enough so that people become absorbed in the movie to the point that they feel they're part of the story.


This statement is from certified educator Noelle Thompson:

"What determines a classic film is the same thing that determines a classic piece of literature: the test of time. Period. No film or literature of substandard
quality would ever survive that test. The key to passing this test of time is a work's universality. .."
Johnny

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Re: Chatting about Doris...

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Those definitions are consistent with what most film historians and fans consider a classic film to be. Definitely, films that stand the test of time and have universal appeal and relevance.

I might add a few things that are on my checklist:

Groundbreaking movies that drive lasting and profound change in the way films are made or viewed.

Movies you can watch multiple times and discover things you overlooked before.

I expect a classic film to make me feel something. I need to be moved to laughter, tears, wonder, anger or action in one form or another.

Movies that prompt me to rethink long held beliefs or opinions. I like films that challenge my thinking and shake my belief system. My opinions may not change, but I think it’s healthy when a film makes me go “hmmmmmm ...”

Films that say something illuminating about the human condition.

Films that expose social injustice, corruption or crime and drive profound change in public opinion and the law.

I don’t expect every film to possess all of the above to qualify, but these are the things I look for in a classic film.

Michael
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Re: Chatting about Doris...

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I wasn't sure where to post this.

TCM's tribute to the actors and filmmakers we lost in 2019.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ktwlkY46gVQ

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Re: Chatting about Doris...

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Thanks for posting this, Michael. What a nice finale.

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Re: Chatting about Doris...

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Thank you so much Michael for posting this TCM Remembers 2019 heartfelt tribute. The haunting
and tender song Waiting by Alice Boman is the perfect pairing.

I did not realize some of these talented and familiar actors had died such as Bill Macy, Verna Bloom, Dianne Foster, Albert Finney, and Danny Aiello.

The quote from Doris Day" I didn't get to say thank you for all the nice things but I love you. Goodnight";
brought me to tears.

I sincerely hope the Academy Awards memorial tribute will ask TCM if they can show this tribute.
It is such a dignified and meaningful work.
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Re: Chatting about Doris...

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I agree, Johnny, this is so well done.

The song, the vocal, the synchronization of the words to the visuals, the split screen effects, the quotes and especially the ending with Doris. Perhaps I’m reading too much into it, but it sure feels like TCM understood how important Doris Day was in film history and they gave her the spotlight she deserved.

I just hope the Academy doesn’t blow it.

Michael
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Re: Chatting about Doris...

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Amen, Michael!

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Re: Chatting about Doris...

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Michael, would it help for members of the Doris Day Forum to email the Academy and ask if they would contact TCM to ask permission to use the TCM Remembers tribute?

To send a message to the Academy email:

Oscars.org

Academy Headquarters
8949 Wilshire Boulevard,
Beverly Hills CA
90211


Just an idea
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Re: Chatting about Doris...

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Johnny,

Sure. If nothing else, it may inspire them to do something different or more innovative in their memorial segment. The last few have been disappointing and I would hope the Academy is open to constructive suggestions.

I’m going to email them and kindly suggest they highlight Doris in some fashion. I’d love to see them do a medley of her signature songs, several of which were from her films and include two Best Song Oscar winners.

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Re: Chatting about Doris...

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Thanks Michael!

I noticed last year John Gavin was not recognized in the memoriam at the Oscars. The production was presented in sepia tones and looked dismal.

The song accompanying the memoriam was called Room At The Top sung by Eddie Vedder. It was devoid of feeling.

I too hope one of Doris' songs is used. Some of the songs from her films that may be appropriate are:


The Very Thought of You
Till We Meet Again
Secret Love
I Speak To The Stars
Someone To Watch Over Me
Johnny

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Re: Chatting about Doris...

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A few others from her films that might work:

I’ll Never Stop Loving You
Too Marvelous For Words
You Made Me Love You

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Re: Chatting about Doris...

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Two songs (but not from her films) whose titles remind me of Doris are "The Song is You" and "There Will Never Be Another You," both of which she recorded in 1956. Five others I think portray her personal philosophy: "Life is Just a Bowl of Cherries," "On the Sunny Side of the Street," "Shakin' the Blues Away," "When You're Smiling," and "Wrap Your Troubles in Dreams."

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Re: Chatting about Doris...

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Thank you Bryan and Ania for a perfect Doris Christmas banner filled with love and warmth.
Johnny

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Re: Chatting about Doris...

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I would like to wish all the Doris Day Forum members a joyous holiday season and a new year filled with good health, kindness, and lots of laughter.

A special and sincere thank you must go to Bryan , our captain, who managed to support members and provide excellent leadership on our beloved DD Forum during this difficult and challenging year. You are responsible for keeping Doris Day's spirit shining brightly for us all.

Thank you all for your informative, caring and interesting posts about Doris and her work. They keep her memory alive and well for us all. It is a true pleasure to read your posts and so satisfying.

🎄🎅🤶🎁☀️🌟⛄🎀🎆
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Re: Chatting about Doris...

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Thank you, Johnny! I thought that I'd share this, reprinted by the Monterey Herald, in memory of Doris.

Looking Back 2019: Doris Day, the passing of a legend
By JAMES HERRERA, Monterey Herald, December 24, 2019

Image
Flowers and notes were left on the front steps of the Cypress Inn in Carmel in honor of Doris Day. (Monterey Herald file)

In 2019, Monterey County lost some significant citizens, including Mike Marotta, the “Mayor of Alvarado Street,” legendary local football coach Luke Phillips and storied produce grower Bob Nunes.
But it was the death of Doris Day in Carmel Valley in May, that made national news. The following is an excerpt from The Herald’s report at the time:


CARMEL – Gently shuddering in the breeze of a cool, sunny day, a small memorial of flowers and a note were laid on the steps of the Cypress Inn in Carmel for the famous co-owner of the boutique hotel who died on May 13. Doris Day, the honey-voiced singer and actress whose film dramas, musicals and innocent sex comedies made her a top star in the 1950s and ’60s and among the most popular screen actresses in history, was 97.

The Doris Day Animal Foundation said she was surrounded by close friends when she died. “It was totally unexpected even though we knew she was sick,” said Dennis LeVett, a close friend and business partner of 35 years. “We were best friends and I absolutely never met a woman like her in all my life.” Together, Day and LeVett jointly own the Cypress Inn in Carmel. The two met through Day’s son Terry Melcher. His son, Ryan, and LeVett’s daughter Amanda both attended Santa Catalina preschool and became best friends. “I got to know Doris Day, the finest talent that ever came along in life.” LeVett said the Inn is a Doris Day creation, it will have her memory and continue to be run like it is today and continue to have the same aura of Day. “She was a great human being and animals will always be welcome here … it will always be a wonderful doggy hotel”, said LeVett.

The foundation said in an emailed statement, “Doris had been in excellent physical health for her age, until recently contracting a serious case of pneumonia, resulting in her death.” The foundation also said she requested “no funeral or memorial service and no grave marker.”

“She was a classy lady,” said Bob Bordeaux, a fan of Day outside the Cypress Inn in Carmel on the day she died. “I grew up with her in the 50s. I remember her music and movies. ‘Que Sera Sera,’ I played that on the accordion.”

Day has been a part of the Monterey Peninsula for decades, being a Carmel Valley resident for more than 40 years and co-owning the Cypress Inn for 20-plus years. Upon leaving the Hollywood spotlight in the 1970s, Day turned her focus to the Doris Day Animal Foundation where her compassion for animals led the fight against animal testing, to advocate for spay/neuter education and outreach programs in the United States.

The foundation has grown into one of the largest animal welfare organizations in the world. “Doris Day was a true champion for the animals and a friend to the SPCA for decades,” said Scott Delucchi, SPCA for Monterey County executive director. “Her love for animals shined through in her kindness, her generosity, and in every conversation. She leaves not only a legacy of incredible entertainment but also compassionate philanthropy and advocacy. She will be deeply missed.”
https://www.montereyherald.com/2019/12/ ... -a-legend/
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Re: Chatting about Doris...

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Thank you, Bryan. Very lovely.

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Re: Chatting about Doris...

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Thank you Bryan. It is a beautiful heartfelt tribute to Doris by James Herrera.

The line said by Doris' friend and business partner of 35 years, Dennis LeVett, that jumped out at me is:" We were best friends and I absolutely never met a woman like her in all my life".

I think Doris' fans had a similar feeling. Her generosity of spirit , kindness and warmth made us feel that she is our friend or wished she were.

The photo of the flowers with the note on the steps of the Cypress Inn is incredibly touching. It is a testament to Doris' loving spirit living on.
Johnny

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Re: Chatting about Doris...

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I Don't think i've posted these quotes before, so here goes:

Ben Mankiewicz (host of Turner Classic Movies) and Mo Rocca (tv personality and host of podcast MoBituaries:

Mankiewicz says Day “was so many things: a great dramatic actress, a comedy actress and a brilliant, brilliant singer. She was one of the most important stars from Hollywood’s golden age.” Adds Rocca, “She managed to be sunny without ever being saccharine, and I think that’s a very hard thing to pull off. And her sensitivity and kindness to her friend Rock Hudson, at a time when people were terrified by AIDS, just reminded us why we loved Doris Day.”
Like Irene Dunne done.

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Re: Chatting about Doris...

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There is an excellent column in the New York Times on the artists that were lost in 2019. The article by Anthony Giardina about Doris Day is very insightful and interesting. This is the opening quote: "She was an actress with subversive potential --who became a symbol of a generation's sexual hypocrisy".
Johnny

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