What young folks think about Doris

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IMDB is my second :lol: favorite website!

They have a million messages boards there and tons of info!
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Jas1
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'Ass' good as it gets!!

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Lauren,

I am unable to view the sites you have posted but can imagine the comments re- Miss Day's derriere - she really had the most wonderful body in films - perfection!

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howard
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If you'd really like to see the comments, link onto the imdb web site: imdb.com ... do a search for doris day ... click on her name ... scroll down to the message board, and the quotes are there. It's worth a peek ... it's good to hear that so many young people enjoy DD's work!

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"Calamity Jane" Assures Doris' Longevity

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Young people. I think that when kids see "Calamity Jane" (and a lot of parents make sure they do), they fall in love with Doris Day and want to know more about her and her other films.

I read the comments of teenagers on IMDb and I was astounded by how many there were. Doris' films are still seen in revival and her true fans have her films on VHS and DVD. Young people do indeed get to see her films.

Thank God for American Movie Classics and Turner TV, both of which show Day's films. All young people are not into Britney Spears and Beyonce...some of them have taste!!!!! :lol:

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age gap

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I think Calamity Jane is the 'key' to Doris' continued awareness among the young. Most youngsters (especially girls) adore Calamity and this will continue from generation to generation, thankfully. Doris [in Calamity] has her very own film that transcends the age brackets and the decades in the way Wizard of OZ, Sound of Music, etc does

For a time my nieces [when aged about 8- 10) rated 'Move over Darling' above Grease, Chitty Chitty bang bang, etc as their favourite. I guess something just shines through in Doris' performances that attract the youth and I think that is wonderful.

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Ralph
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Lies!!!

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Wouldn't it be "too much like right" for the networks to give "Calamity Jane" the same respect they give "The Wizard of Oz"? They won't, of course, because many of them are from the "I hate Doris Day era."

I have never been able to sit through the entire "Oz" film without getting sick and tired of it. Not so with "Gone With The Wind" or "Calamity Jane".
I always make popcorn when I settle down to watch "old Clam."

It's funny with the way Judy Garland and Marilyn Monroe are portrayed today, you'd think that they were bigger movie stars than Doris Day. You and I know that they weren't. I constantly hear about Marilyn, "she was the biggest star of her era..." Lies, lies, lies!!!!!!!!!! :evil:

And, if Judy Garland had made "Love Me or Leave Me," they would hail it as a classic today.

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June Allyson is dead

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RANDY: As the stars fade out, stardust memories remain
Stardust memories remain

RANDY FITZGERALD
TIMES-DISPATCH COLUMNIST Jul 21, 2006


June Allyson is dead, and I don't feel so good myself.

I wish I could claim that line, but I stole it from my all-time favorite syndicated columnist, the late Lewis Grizzard of Atlanta, who once wrote a book called "Elvis is Dead and I Don't Feel So Good Myself."

I hated to see Allyson's obituary last week, hate to see those old stars die off -- and most of them are already gone: Ava Gardner. Hedy Lamarr. Linda Darnell.

A whole pack of redheads: Rita Hayworth, Rhonda Flem ing, Arlene Dahl and Susan Hayward.

With Allyson's death, Elizabeth Taylor and Lauren Bacall are about the last ones left from that Golden Age of Hollywood.

If you're old enough to remember June Allyson, you probably are, like me, too old.

June Allyson was the older woman when I was a younger boy, and we fellows are always a little bit taken with older women.

I noted from Allyson's obituary last week that she actually was 23 years older than I. That was a surprise, but when you're 11 or 12, and there's this sweet-faced, soft-voiced, kind-hearted, perfect woman on that big silver screen -- heck, what's a few years' age difference? You're even willing to go see "Little Women" a couple of times with your sister.

I think I first discovered June Allyson, though, when she played Jimmy Stewart's wife in "The Glenn Miller Story." Though I was still in my tender years at that time, I instantly knew that here was the kind of woman a fellow should probably marry.

And even though I had serious interest later in Natalie Wood, Marilyn Monroe and Kim Novak, June Allyson always was there, waiting in the background, peering through the rose bushes and watching me over the picket fence.

"Who the dickens is Hilary Duff?" I asked Barb recently. To make matters worse, I think I actually have asked her that question twice in recent months, because I wasn't enough impressed the first time to remember the answer for more than a few minutes.

And Lindsay Lohan? Ah, Lindsay, whoever you are, have you ever heard of Ava Gardner?

When Barb and I were driving back from Charleston, S.C., this summer, we were delighted to come upon one of those official interstate signs directing us to the Ava Gardner Museum in Smithfield, N.C. Of course we stopped by -- could you doubt it? It was well worth the detour and the cost of admission, which I think was $4 or $5.

The museum actually had a fair amount of business, and I wondered whether Richmond, with all its museums, might not create a small one somewhere for its own hometown celebrities: tennis legend Arthur Ashe, actress Shirley MacLaine, actor Warren Beatty and author Tom Wolfe grew up within a mile or two of one other in North Side.

Maybe somewhere around The Diamond we could find a place to honor our North Side celebs. That might be fun. I'd go. After all, we've just seen how much the city loved its Elliott Yamin. We're as celebrity-conscious as any place else.

I do hope you'll forgive me, though, if I suggest that Richmond never has had the likes of Ava Gardner. Now there was a dangerous woman, and we fellows always are a little bit taken with dangerous women.

Barb and I roamed the Gardner museum for nearly an hour, watching a little movie on the star's life, admiring the gowns she wore in "Showboat" and "Mogambo" and objets d'art from her home, and chatting with the docent who knew more about Ava Gardner than anybody since Frank Sinatra.

(By the way, it's not true that Sinatra, her ex-husband -- she was the love of his life -- paid for Ava's funeral, but he did pay to fly her body back to North Carolina from England, where she had been living for some years before her death.)

I suppose in a few years no one will much remember Gardner or Hayworth, Doris Day or Betty Grable. Vera Ellen, Lana Turner, Esther Williams. Or June Allyson, either. But I will. I grew up in the Golden Age of Hollywood, and I was a little bit taken with all of them.


Contact Randy Fitzgerald at [email protected] or (804) 289-8058.

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I was made fun of in my teens for loving Doris Day and not the Rolling Stones... it was uncool to like wholesome. family oriented movies which Doris played in... If it wasn't about freedom--make love not war... free love and gettin' stoned, it wasn't the IN thing...

I totally agree with your words, "the I hate Doris Day era"--Doris was the best; she will never be topped in any of her talents--No one has the class that she had, and the ability to keep her head from blowing up from being too full of herself and her popuarity...
__________________________________________

Doris Day remained popular amist all of the jokes about her "virginity" and the other nonsense. Remember, her TV show was a big hit for all those years.

Doris, herself, fed some of that criticism. I always cringe when I look at the opening of The Doris Day Show when Doris hops across the street like a young kid. What was that all about? But the opening of her show set the mold for Mary Tyler Moore. Do you think that Mary would have done the "hat thing" without Doris' trouble with her hat in the opening?

Even in her interviews, Doris played up the "I don't know anything about sex" routine. On the Tonight Show, she played the "isn't it shocking that I went to see 'Last Tango in Paris"? "I'm Doris Day! Aren't you shocked audience?!!!!"

She tried to show a little "maturity" when she suggested that a woman live with a man before she marries him. That was the big "shocker" from DORIS DAY: HER OWN STORY. The late night talk show hosts had a field day with that one.

I also lived through many years of defending Doris when her name was mentioned at a party and somebody would say, "Oh, I cannot stand her...she's too goody goody." This, while they were taking a drag on an illegal "cigarette."

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Ralph
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Nice Girls Won't Work In Hollywood Today

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Allyson's niceness wouldn't fly in today's Hollywood

By Ed Blank
TRIBUNE-REVIEW FILM AND THEATER CRITIC
Sunday, July 23, 2006


If you think they're a dying breed, you're ... well, who's to argue with you? We still have Doris Day, who was born April 3, 1924, the same day as the late Marlon Brando, who never worked with her.

And we have Jane Powell (April 1, 1929) and Debbie Reynolds (April 1, 1932), their early April links duly noted.

They're the last three, or at least the most successful three, surviving American "girls next door" now that June Allyson's July 8 death at age 88 removes her from a list that once included Judy Garland, Donna Reed and many others.

It's not that the actresses in question necessarily were who we perceived them to be. All privately were more ambitious than any character they played.

Although it was Powell who named her biography "The Girl Next Door," playing off her image from such movies as "Royal Wedding" and "Seven Brides for Seven Brothers," Allyson embodied the girl-next-door concept more absolutely and in more movies than anyone.

Girls next door might be tomboys, like the one Day played in "On Moonlight Bay" and again in "By the Light of the Silvery Moon." She might win the family picnic softball game, get all greasy repairing the engine of dad's LaSalle or park her fists on her hips while telling off some bully.

But the girl next door was as sweet as "The Girl That I Marry" that the character Frank Butler rhapsodized about in "Annie Get Your Gun."

She could have gumption and get-up-and-go, but beyond the inevitable, even necessary, attractiveness, she was diplomatic, smarter than she let on, sensitive, conciliatory and, though virginal at her wedding, rarin' to become the perfect wife and the perfect mother without even a hint that maybe one led to the other.

She was nothing if not supportive. And being home all day keeping house, she was prepared to invest herself in the worries brought home by her breadwinning spouse in the post-World War II years.

The girl next door wasn't quite real, of course. She exemplified an ideal of American family life that was prevalent in the movies of the 1930s and '40s, that peaked in the early 1950s and had all but vanished by the late '60s.

It's easier for audiences today to appreciate the tougher, more independent, career-minded personality styles of Rosalind Russell and others, especially Katharine Hepburn, because such actresses seldom were offered, or accepted, parts that failed to define them as standing apart.

Hepburn and Allyson, both of whom played spunky Jo March in film versions of "Little Women," were men's best friends -- great allies in vastly different respects.

Hepburn marched into battles rattling a psychological saber, her eyes betraying a sharp wit and intelligence that even she, for all her mastery of craft, could not mask.

She was fond of saying that when she made nine films with the authoritative Spencer Tracy from 1942-67, the audience enjoyed seeing her buzz around him like an impertinent, smarter-than-he bee, but that the audience also savored the moment when he, even if just verbally, swatted her one.

No one swatted, or even glared in the direction of, the incomparably more docile Allyson, who won whatever she wanted with sheer niceness. She wasn't paired with the Tracys and the John Waynes of the business. Her one teaming with tough guy Humphrey Bogart in "Battle Circus" didn't work for either.

Allyson was paired multiple times with the more temperamentally suited Van Johnson, Peter Lawford and Jimmy Stewart -- but only when he was in nice guy mode. None was likely to betray or impose on such niceness.

We've changed so much as a society in so many ways since Allyson's heyday in "Good News" and "The Glenn Miller Story" that the world her movies defined and reflected must seem like an alien culture to any young person watching them today -- if that ever even happens.

Jennifer Aniston, Angelina Jolie and Paris Hilton occupy today's magazine covers and project personae so far removed from mid-20th-century girls next door that the change is irreconcilable.

The girl next door moved. If she were to return, like Dorothy at the end of "The Wizard of Oz," she wouldn't recognize the farm from which she was evicted.



Ed Blank is the Tribune-Review's film and Broadway critic. He can be reached at [email protected]

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two young fans of Doris

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Two friends of mine recently told me about their grand children who really love our dear Doris. Charlie, age 13, is the grandson of Barbara...Charlie recently told her, "Grandma, Doris is HOT!" while watching her on TV.
ANother friend from the Chicago area has an 11 year old grand daughter who has all of Doris's movies and Doris is her very favorite movie star. It is refreshing to learn about these young kids who know talent when they see it and can relate to Doris. :D

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i think i qualify for this topic im fourteen tommorow and i LOVE DORISDAY she is my favorite singer & actress and all around great person. I speak from being young today that most young people dont know her or care too sadly its there lose but im lucky not to be one of them! Doris is the best nothing is better than pillow talk haha!

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Re: "Calamity Jane" Assures Doris' Longevity

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Ralph wrote: Thank God for American Movie Classics and Turner TV, both of which show Day's films. All young people are not into Britney Spears and Beyonce...some of them have taste!!!!! :lol:
I am with you Ralph... THANK GOD FOR AMC AND TCM!!! I'm turning 15 in April, exactly 2 weeks after Doris' birthday April 17! Sadly, yes it's true, a lot of my generation don't know who Doris Day is. But I am making sure at least a few more do. Anytime my friends stay the night, they are required to watch at least 1 Doris Day movie. After we watch the first, they usually say... OMG who was that??? She was great, can we watch another??? As long as a few people know Doris and keep passing it on to friends and eventually kids and grandkids, we will have more and more people getting to know Doris Day!

I have 1 more question to ask you all... WHY don't they sell stuff with Doris Day's face on it??? They sell stuff with Marilyn Monroe, and Judy Garland... but not Doris... I would MUCH rather own a purse, shirt, or blanket with Doris Day's face on it rather than Marilyn Monroe's...
Megan
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“Be who you are and say what you feel, because those who mind don't matter, and those who matter don't mind.”― Dr. Seuss

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babe, that is exacty what i dont understand about items with doris on it i did see a tote with her on it if you google doris day bags a site comes up that has some they are around 90 dollers and there made out of some kind of wood fabric but there still doris day totes if you ever wanted to check it out. I am still trying to find a way to buy the pbs documentary on her anyone know where to get this please?

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Re: "Calamity Jane" Assures Doris' Longevity

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Ralph wrote:Young people. I think that when kids see "Calamity Jane" (and a lot of parents make sure they do), they fall in love with Doris Day and want to know more about her and her other films.

I read the comments of teenagers on IMDb and I was astounded by how many there were. Doris' films are still seen in revival and her true fans have her films on VHS and DVD. Young people do indeed get to see her films.

Thank God for American Movie Classics and Turner TV, both of which show Day's films. All young people are not into Britney Spears and Beyonce...some of them have taste!!!!! :lol:
I certainly must be living somewhere out in Antarctica ! How come I have yet to meet these other DD fans ?
None of the people I have come across born after a certain time seem to have even heard of her ! It is great to read that there are younger people that know about her and enjoy her work. Wish I could get a chance to meet such people before I get too old ! :?

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Re: What young folks think about Doris

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I am happy to say that all my neices and nephews (aged 5 and up) know Doris Day very well as both a singer and an actress....and they LOVE her.
I sponsor 5 or 6 day bus trips a year. On 90 percent of those trips, the bus group views (and loves) the movies by Doris!

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Re: What young folks think about Doris

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Then I know that I'm definitely living in the wrong place ! :cry:

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Re: What young folks think about Doris

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I recently purchased a new computer. The young lady (approx. 20) helped load it into my car. Well my license plate frame reads: Line 1: Addicted to ... Line 2: Doris Day. The young girl noticed it and she went "Oh, Doris Day, isn't she great!" I said you know her, how wonderful. She replied that she had learned about many of the stars of yore in her film class at college. So, there is hope!
Like Irene Dunne done.

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Re: What young folks think about Doris

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howard wrote:I recently purchased a new computer. The young lady (approx. 20) helped load it into my car. Well my license plate frame reads: Line 1: Addicted to ... Line 2: Doris Day. The young girl noticed it and she went "Oh, Doris Day, isn't she great!" I said you know her, how wonderful. She replied that she had learned about many of the stars of yore in her film class at college. So, there is hope!
Then I know for sure I am truly living in the wrong place !!!!! In my area, I have yet to come across anyone who knows anything about Doris nor any of the talents from that era----from the 'younger'crowd. I've been searching for such people for many years now but to no avail. Beyond my folks and a family acquaintance--who is 80 years young and a member of the BING CROSBY INTERNATIONAL SOCIETY------I have yet to run into any fans of standard music or even admitting to watching movies on TCM. Undoubtedly, they do exist but I have not had the fortune of meeting them so that is why I am lucky to be on this forum-----therefore please excuse me for my frequent and lengthy postings. Really, its never a good idea for anyone to overcompensate but-------------- !
I may reside in the New York Metro Area but hard as it may seem we do not even have any commerical radio stations playing Como, Day, Crosby, Page, or anyone else for that matter.
For several decades -- WNEW - was the flagship for American Popular Standards. It was a very strong AM station and it did have many followers.
However, in 1992 - Mike Bloomberg (long before he became mayor of NYC) bought WNEW and changed its format to 'Bloomberg News' so gone was WNEW.
Then for a time it appeared that there was going to be some sort of a solution. WQXR - The Classical Music Station of the NY Times---had both an AM & FM band. In 1993, it was decided that the FM would remain classical but the AM would be transformed into an American Popular Standards Station with the call-letters WQEW. It continued with the basically same format as the previous WNEW------the surviving singing stars would often call into the station-----I remember Rosemary Clooney would almost always be interviewed on the station each and every time she was appearing LIVE in Manhattan at the Rainbow Room--and there were others as well.
It seemed to be progressing quite nicely---TILL - in 1998, Disney bought the station and changed it into a 'Kiddie Format'.
Then came a very weak station in New Jersey - WVNJ - billing itself as the STATION OF THE STARS trying to fill the void. Its signal though was extremely weak-----there was always much flutter while the songs would cut in and out.
Then after a bit-----WVNJ changed its format to become a station for HOLISTIC MEDICINE which an emphasis on lectures regarding vitamins and organic foods. No music there at all anymore !!!!
So I am living in an area which a large population----and no 'standard stations' to be found. Each and every time I drive---up and down those dials I go !!!! Very dreary and bleak ! :cry:
So its no wonder that the younger generations in my area apparently know little of this music. As to whether or not they watch TCM----I have no way of knowing that either.
Its a shame that I have to keep my tastes to myself. Either these people will have no idea of what I speak or I will be labeled as an 'uncontemporary' person--believe me I have already been told that on more than one occasion ! :roll:
So if anyone from the New York Metro Area happens to be reading this post-------and happens to enjoy Doris and Como and all the rest------please step forward and introduce yourself. I would like to be able to establish a very nice communication and hopefully a good dialogue.
Thanks !

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Re: What young folks think about Doris

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I live close to New York in Pennsylvania. I don't know if I would count.
It's a wonderful day for Doris Day <3
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Re: What young folks think about Doris

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daybyday08 wrote:I live close to New York in Pennsylvania. I don't know if I would count.
Sure it counts - DaybyDay - so please feel free to keep in touch ! :)
Thanks !

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Re: What young folks think about Doris

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In the office where I work, I passed the desk of three ladies aged mid 20s; early 30s and 40 and they were talking about Doris and Calamity Jane and the chemistry with Rock.

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Re: '****' good as it gets!!

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Jas1 wrote:Lauren,

(I am unable to view the sites you have posted but can imagine the comments re- Miss Day's derriere - she really had the most wonderful body in films - perfection!
That is true. Doris Day had the most perfect figure of any woman in Hollywood, or anywhere else for that matter. It's too bad she came along when she did. If she were starting today she would be rated as a sex goddess, though she would probably resent it. What she did for those Navy dungarees in "Move Over Darling" was beyond phenomenal.

But I loved (love) her for who she is, and for her perfect voice, and for the cutest freckled face ever, not to mention that I am an animal lover and her work in that area alone gains my total admiration.

I adore her. I have for around 65 years.

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