THE PAJAMA GAME

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Total votes: 82

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Re: THE PAJAMA GAME

Unread post by webmaster »

Thanks Judy & Johnny, yes, I noticed Dyersville is in Iowa as I was looking around at photos. Isn't that where Mary Anne comes from?
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Re: THE PAJAMA GAME

Unread post by webmaster »

I came across:

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Doris Day's The Pajama Game (1957)
Directed By Stanley Donen / The Museum of Cinema

The Pajama Game (1957) Stars: Doris Day, John Raitt, Carol Haney - 1h 41min | Comedy, Drama, Musical | 10 December 1957

Watch or download - ask me i you need help.

https://www.dailymotion.com/video/x75l9aj
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Johnny
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Re: THE PAJAMA GAME

Unread post by Johnny »

In David Kaufman's book chapter 17 , "I'm Not at All in Love", on The Pajama starts with:
"After her departure from Warner Brothers Day quickly established herself as one of the finest screen actresses of her generation. However, it seems fitting that she did return to her home studio to make one of her best musical films.
Based on a smash Broadway hit that opened at the St. James Theater on May 13, 1954, The Pajama Game provided Day with a role that might have been written for her. While her last three characters-- Ruth Sitting, in Live Me or Leave Me, Jo McKenna in The Man Who Knew Too Much, and the title character in Julie had each emphasized Day's vulnerable qualities, her Babe Williams in The Pajama Game revealed her hard and fiercely independent side. A working woman, Babe will not even permit her budding romance with a factory foreman to get in the way of her proto-feminist principles -- or her job. Though it may be oversimplifying the analogy, Day could be as outgoing as her mother and as withdrawn as her father--depending on the situation. Moreover , she could draw upon both contrary temperaments at the same time , perhaps, never with such winning effect as in The Pajama Game."

Other notes - A note from Jack Warner's conversation with George Abbot states Abbot's first choice to play opposite Doris was Marlon Brando and his second was Gordon MacRae.

"Bing Crosby knocked himself out of the running by demanding$200, 000 plus 5 per cent of the gross in addition to 25 percent of the gross for his company".

Frank Sinatra was considered for the role of Sid Sorokin as was Howard Keel. Rock Hudson was considered as well.

Doris was paid $250,000 for her role as Babe Williams. When Doris started at Warners eight years before, she earned $250.00 a week. John Raitt received $25,000.


In this chapter columnist Sheila Graham is quoted about the film South Pacific: " It's the first film Doris has ever said , " This I want to do"."There's only one guy she wants to do it woth--Cary Grant, who believe it or not has a good singing voice"
Johnny

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jmichael
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Re: THE PAJAMA GAME

Unread post by jmichael »

Johnny, thank you for sharing these tidbits.

I agree that Babe Williams and Doris Day were a match made in movie heaven. Babe's fierceness, her resolve, her integrity - all of that suited Doris to a tee. Doris was pretty much always the motor that made her movies run. She had a real presence about her that made everyone sit up and take notice.

This is one of her best musicals although at times it feels a bit stagy and confined to me. I wish they'd gone outside more as in the rousing Once A Day Year production number. My other tiny quibble is the decibel level at which Doris and John Raitt sang in There Once Was A Man. It's a bombastic number (as Doris once described it) but they were shouting too much for my taste. I greatly prefer her tender readings of Hey There and The Man Who Invented Love over this or I'm Not At All In Love.

Michael
Michael H

"There's nothing in my bedroom that bothers me."

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