Young at Heart

You are invited to rate and comment on the 39 films of Doris Day.

How do you rate "Young at Heart"?

Poor
1
1%
Average
5
6%
Good
32
41%
Excellent
40
51%
 
Total votes: 78

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Ania
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Re: Young at Heart

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Johnny
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Re: Young at Heart

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Perfect pictures Ania!

The kitchen scene with Doris and Frank and the shortbread is one of my favourite scenes in Young At Heart.

Thank you!
Johnny

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Re: Young at Heart

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Thank you Johnny :D
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Re: Young at Heart

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Johnny
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Re: Young at Heart

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Thanks Ania for the great Young At heart photo of Ethel Barrymore, Doris and Frank. What a powerhouse combination of talent all in one picture.

Doris and Frank really look like they are taking the conversation seriously and listening to Ethel's character with full attention.
Johnny

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Re: Young at Heart

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The original ending in Young At Heart had Frank Sinatra's moody character Barney Sloane dying. In Frank's two previous film's From Here To Eternity (1953) and Suddenly (1954), his character had died. Frank had the clout to demand a change in the script that allowed Barney to live.

Frank Sinatra recorded Young At Heart first and then recorded it with Doris Day. The album reached #11 on the Billboard charts. The single reached #2. Due to the song's success, it became the title for the film. I can't identify if Young At Heart had a previous title.

The Young At Heart song was considered Sinatra's comeback single since it had been several years away from the top of the charts.
Johnny

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Jas1
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Re: Young at Heart

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I find it frustrating that in the past -[this may have changed as the critics view of Doris has rightly improved] - that critics are often dismissive of Young at Heart when discussing Sinatra - and it did play a pivotal role in his career - as it was his first leading role [again] following the supporting role in From Here to Eternity - it certainly didn't help that he was teamed with DD - so the success of that film set Frank up nicely for a further film [and recording] career- that cannot be under-estimated. Had Frank followed up Eternity with a dud [box office wise] the story could have been very different - regardless of the critical acclaim and Oscar from Eternity - as Bette Davis said many times- from the 1950s on- [with the breakdown of the studio system] stars really were judged solely on their last film - hit wise.

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howard
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Re: Young at Heart

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Johnny: I never heard Frank and Doris singing "Young at Heart" together. Never even heard Doris sing it alone. Where can I find this treasure?
Like Irene Dunne done.

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Johnny
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Re: Young at Heart

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Hi Howard,

I found the album cover:
Young At Heart - Doris Day and Frank Sinatra
Young At Heart - Doris Day and Frank Sinatra
C__Data_Users_DefApps_AppData_INTERNETEXPLORER_Temp_Saved Images_image(7).jpg (35.13 KiB) Viewed 4062 times
I will check out another album. Perhaps a Young At Heart version with Doris is on a Frank Sinatra album.

Good luck Howard!
Johnny

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Johnny
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Re: Young at Heart

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Howard,

Search out Young At Heart soundtrack cover photo & it will give you some leads.

Here is another one:
Young At Heart -Doris Day and Frank Sinatra
Young At Heart -Doris Day and Frank Sinatra
Young at Heart (Doris Day and Frank Sinatra album) - Wikipedia, the ___.jpg (14.21 KiB) Viewed 4062 times
Johnny

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howard
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Re: Young at Heart

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I've heard this last one. No DD "YAH" song.
Like Irene Dunne done.

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Re: Young at Heart

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As far as I know, there is neither a Day-Sinatra duet nor a Doris single of Young at Heart, and maybe this will help to explain why:

Unless recording a duet specifically for a film, someone who was under contract to one label could rarely, if ever, cut recordings with another singer who was under contract to a rival label. Like Gordon MacRae, Sinatra was under contract to Capitol Records, a competitor of Doris's label (Columbia), at the time this movie was being made. The duets they sang with Doris on film were done in the music studio on the Warner Bros. lot; the same recordings were not included on the Columbia albums issued under those movie titles.

As to why Doris did not record Young at Heart as a single, there is likely more than one answer. Naturally, Capitol Records didn't want anyone else to give serious competition to Sinatra's gold record of the song. Also, since his singing career was finally revitalized, Sinatra was probably very aggressively guarding his status. Further, I wouldn't be surprised if Marty Melcher tried just as aggressively to get the rights to Young at Heart so that Doris could record it. (Maybe hard-ball tactics were part of what caused the big disagreement between him and Sinatra.)

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Re: Young at Heart

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I've always thought Melcher might have fought to have Doris sing the title song. That would surely be enough to spark a resentment between him and Sinatra. I would have loved to hear Doris sing the song, but "Young at Heart" is Sinatra's big hit. The title song rightly belongs to him.
Like Irene Dunne done.

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Johnny
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Re: Young at Heart

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Great insight Howard.

I listened to the Young At Heart soundtrack and watched the film today. Young At Heart is not on the soundtrack.

In the film, Frank Sinatra sings Young At Heart during the opening credits. Robert Keith who plays Doris' father plays Young At Heart on the flute.

It is curious that Young At Heart is listed on some albums with both Frank Sinatra and Doris Day's names .
I can't find any listing where Doris sings Young At Heart. Frank Sinatra has it listed on his 1963 album Sinatra's Sinatra.
As you said Howard, Young At Heart belongs solely to Sinatra. Doris would have done a brilliant job with this song.
Johnny

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Jas1
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Re: Young at Heart

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Doris was so beautiful in this film - I love her look - i love Laurie Tuttle. Love that kitchen-- still - however, the size of those gingerbread men always made me laugh.

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jmichael
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Re: Young at Heart

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I just watched this sweet film again the other night.

It is still so charming. I love how civil and polite everyone is and how the family is united through their love of music. Some people would find it corny today and it does have a few moments that feel dated, but the acting is uniformly strong. You believe that Doris, Dorothy and Elizabeth are sisters and their steadfast love for their father rings true. I adore the knowing looks of wisdom and insight that dart across the expressive face of Ethel Barrymore as venerable Aunt Jesse. Her scenes with Sinatra are terrific, as they size each other up and she holds her own against his moody character. It's nice to see Gig Young in a leading romantic role instead of playing second banana or comic relief to the male lead. I also admired how the director and the actors conveyed the romantic yearning and melancholy that Dorothy Malone and Elizabeth Fraser felt toward Gig Young. This was well played as each sister eventually realized that true love comes in sizes and shapes beyond the matinee idol variety.

Many people do not understand why Laurie chose Barney over Alex, but Barney was her human Number Nine. Sinatra was literally the runt of the litter among the cast and Laurie's heart went to the underdog. I think her choice was true to her character. My main issue with the film is Sinatra's refusal to die, although I understand why he insisted on the script change. Still, it undercuts the emotional impact of the finale - just think how devastating it would have been to hear Doris / Laurie sing Barney's song to their new baby a few months after he died. That would have given the film a more dramatically satisfying conclusion instead of the Hallmark Card fade-out they chose. And perhaps most glaring of all - how could anyone in a noisy bar or restaurant ignore the exquisite singing of Frank Sinatra when he makes Someone To Watch Over Me and One For The Road soar beyond the stratosphere?

All in all, Young At Heart is a delightful example of mid-century, big studio filmmaking that was heartwarming, entertaining and winningly professional on every level.

Michael
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Re: Young at Heart

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Some fine observations, Michael (as usual). I, too, think this is a sweet film. It was very well cast and well performed all the way around.

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Re: Young at Heart

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Johnny
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Re: Young at Heart

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Thank Ania for the great Young At Heart clips.

The emotional connection between Doris and Frank's characters is clearly evident. There is a rarely seen softness in Frank's face while Doris looks at him with wonder and tenderness.

Young At Heart is a really charming and entertaining film with an excellent cast.
Johnny

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Re: Young at Heart

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According to David Kaufman's book on Doris, there were forty-one days of shooting for Young At Heart beginning on July 22nd and completed on September 21st.

The budget for Young At Heart was $1,110,000. The entire cast received $277,199 with Frank Sinatra commanding $85,000, nearly a third of the total. Doris Day had a $100,000 fee. Doris' payment is impressive since at that time most male stars typically received more than their female co-stars.

Co-stars Ethel Barrymore and Gig Young were each paid $25,000. Originally Lucille Watson and Fay Bainter were considered for the part of Aunt Jesse and would have been paid $15,000. Melvyn Douglas wanted $35,000 to play the father Mr. Tuttle. The part went to Robert Keith. Dorothy Malone was paid $1,250 while Alan Hale was paid $850.00.

Frank Sinatra had difficulty getting along with people on The Young At Heart set. He had original director Charles Lang replaced with Ted Mc Cord. Doris speculated that Sinatra's impatience with Lang taking too long with camera set-ups for a scene seemed to be the problem. Sinatra also had Doris' husband Marty Melcher banished from the set.

Young Ar Heart remains a charming, heartfelt and sentimental time -capsule capturing early 1950's cinema reflecting family life. It is truly enjoyable.
Johnny

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Re: Young at Heart

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Interesting salary info, Johnny. It's too bad that Charles Lang was replaced as cinematographer in this film, as he was such a talented man; 45 years after his last film, he's still tied for the most Oscar nominations (18) in that category. Doris had worked with Ted McCord previously -- on "Young Man with a Horn," "I'll See You in My Dreams," and "Starlift" -- but he didn't have nearly the reputation that Lang had. One of McCord's 3 Oscar nominations was for "Sound of Music," though, which I think was well deserved.

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Re: Young at Heart

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Fascinating salary information - go Doris!

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Johnny
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Re: Young at Heart

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In The Doris Day Scrapbook, author Alan Gelb's review on Young At Heart states:

"On paper, it seemed that her (Doris), second film of 1954 would be a surefire blockbuster. It was called Young At Heart; it was based on one of the smash hit of the Depression (Fannie Hurst's Four Daughters), with the Lane Sisters and John Garfield); and starring opposite Doris was the one-and-only Frank Sinatra. The script was by Lenore Coffee and Julius Epstein (whom you'll remember from Doris' first film Romance On The High Seas). The director was Gordon Douglas, a competent craftsman who was responsible for such good films as Come Fill The Cup with James Cagney, and the science fiction thriller Them. (He would later be Sinatra's court director with Robin and The Seven Hoods, Tony Rome, et al). The cast was a topnotch one: Gig Young, Dorothy Malone, Ethel Barrymore, Robert Keith, and Elizabeth Fraser. Things looked rosy indeed. But, for a number of reasons, Young At Heart didn't work very well at all.

the plot of Young At heart held no surprises. it had to do with an unusually close-knit musical family: Doris plays the piano and sings; Sister Malone is the harpist; Sister Fraser is the violinist; Father Keith is on the flute; and Aunt Ethel Barrymore gazes on beatifically. No family structure sweeter or more content had been seen since … well, since Four Daughters. Doris is engaged to composer Gig Young, and all is right with the world. Into the smug little colony comes Barney Sloan (Sinatra), an enigmatic and brooding pianist hired by Young to orchestrate the songs for Young's forthcoming musical. Almost at once there is trouble: Doris realizes that Sister Fraser is smitten beyond repair with Young and so in that curious combination of self-sacrifice and desire that marks so many of her characters, Doris elopes with Sinatra...…

Young At Heart was full of holes. There never seemed to be any effort to explain Doris' attraction to Sinatra. Indeed, they are like oil and water. As in Young Man With A horn, where Doris was the foil for another tormented musician, her sunny optimism seems irretrievably at odds with the man in her life. Sinatra's character is also confused by the pantywaist approach to the story's inevitable conclusion. In the 1938 film version, John Garfield as the Angry Young Man was allowed to die and hence the sense of doom he carried throughout the film made sense. In Young At Heart, Sinatra comes out smiling at he end, which, in the face of it all that comes before, makes him seem like nothing more than a rehabilitated kvetch.

The remainder of interest the film lies in several isolated musical numbers. The score, by Jimmy van Heusen and Mack Gordon, was not wonderful, but it had a lovely ballad ("You My Love"), and the enormously popular title song. Beyond that, it had Sinatra soloing on " Someone To Watch over Me", " Just One of Those Things", and "One For MY Baby". When Ol' Blue Eyes lets loose on those great standards, nothing else seems to matter and the picture becomes, for those fleeting moments, something special".

Again in this review, I find Gelb can't resist snarky unfair remarks.

Songs rom the soundtrack were released as an album by Frank Sinatra and Doris Day, also titled Young At Heart. The album peaked at #11 on the Billboard charts while the single reached #2 and was considered Sinatra's comeback single after several years away from the top of the top of the pop singles chart.

The film Young At Heart earned $2.5 million at the box office.
Johnny

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Johnny
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Re: Young at Heart

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I came across this nteresting trivia about Young at Heart:


The film remained untitled until Frank's "Young at Heart", became a smash hit and was tagged o to the opening credits.

This was the last film Doris Day made as an exclusive contract player at "Warner Brothers". It was co-produced by "Warner Brothers" and Arwin Productions , the company formed by Day and her manager/husband Martin Melcher. This was the first for "Arwin Productions".


t some point in their careers, four members of this cast won an Oscar for Best supporting performance: Ethel Barrymore for (None But The Lonely Heart" -1944), Frank Sinatra (From Here To Eternity-1953), Dorothy Malone (Written on the Wind",-1957); Gig Young ("They Shoot Horses Don't They"?-1969)


In the original 1938 version, three of the "Four Daughters" , were played by real life siblings Lola, Priscilla and Rosemary Lan

The role played by Frank Sinatra here was portrayed by John Garfield in the 1938 original version of this material, Four Daughters. It was Garfield's screen debut , and earned him a Best Supporting Actor Oscar nomination.

Young at Heart remains a charming touching film that is a pleasure to watch. Doris Day shines along with the rest of this talented cast.
Johnny

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Re: Young at Heart

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This film is too sweet and Americana for Gelb's tastes. It's about as Mid-Century Eisenhower as it gets and that apparently didn't set well with his cynicism. I do agree that Sinatra's refusal to die harmed the ending, but WB made this version for Mid-Century, middle class Americans who loved Doris, Frank and happy endings. They don't call it show business for nothing.

Michael
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