The Man Who Knew Too Much

You are invited to rate and comment on the 39 films of Doris Day.

How do you rate "The Man Who Knew Too Much"?

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0
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1
1%
Good
12
15%
Excellent
65
83%
 
Total votes: 78

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The Man Who Knew Too Much

Unread post by webmaster »

So how do you rate "The Man Who Knew Too Much"?

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Ken
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Man Who Knew Too Much

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I rate this as excellent.This is a thriller from start to finish. Doris sang We'll Love Again toward the end of movie in the embassy scene after Doris sings Que Sera Sera loudly. As James Stewart is searching for their son on the second floor of the embassy Doris is at the piano singing We'll Love Again to keep everybody's attention.

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Peter Flapper
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The man who knew too much

Unread post by Peter Flapper »

Hi all,

Tis is the film that introduced Doris Day in my life, that happend more than fourteen years ago. A week after this film I bought my first cd, and that was the start of my everlasting love. Que sera sera... and We'll love again... (did you know there are two versions? 1956 and 1961)

Peter

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Unread post by bluebird1115 »

Once stereo records became available in 1958 it was common for artists to go back and re-record songs previously released in monaural.

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howard
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A classic!

Unread post by howard »

This is one terrific film ... a genuine classic! It should be considered one of Hitchcock's finest, but for some reason, it isn't as well appreciated as it deserves to be. There are some who feel the original version is better than this remake, but I totally disagree. The film is a masterpiece in suspense and Doris' performance is perfection! One of her finest! I voted "excellent."

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Peter Flapper
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We'll love again

Unread post by Peter Flapper »

Hi Webmaster,

The song you used on the page of The man who knew too much is from February 24th of 1956 Doris is singing under direction of Frank DeVol. (This song is, according to the Bear Family Set, recorded on the same date as: Somebody Somewhere and Que sera sera)

We'll love again is recorded again may 3th of 1961 under direction of Jim Harbert for the album: I believe in dreams

Peter

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Unread post by bluebird1115 »

I avoid comparing this and the 1934 version. They are really completely different animals. This version is excellent and Stewart and Day have great chemistry. The elements of suspense and comedy are well balanced, and the Storm Cloud Cantata sequence is thrilling. I also love the scene in the church when Day and Stewart are singing the hymn and she sings a little too loudly in their expository exchange.

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We'll love again

Unread post by webmaster »

The song you used on the page of The man who knew too much is from February 24th of 1956 Doris is singing under direction of Frank DeVol. (This song is, according to the Bear Family Set, recorded on the same date as: Somebody Somewhere and Que sera sera)

We'll love again is recorded again may 3th of 1961 under direction of Jim Harbert for the album: I believe in dreams
Thanks Peter, I've got "I Believe in Dreams" - one of my old favourites - I'll check out the differences.
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The Man Who Knew Too Much

Unread post by Teachers_Pet »

Alfred Hitchcock himself said, in retrospect, that the 1934 version was that of an amateur; and the 1956 version was that of a professional.

Hitchcock's daughter, Pat, says MAN WHO is one of her favorite Hitchcock movies in her commentary found on the DVD.

I, too, have noticed that this movie seems to be underrated compared to the more well-known ones: PSYCHO, VERTIGO. I don't know why, but I like this more each time I see it. I've seen the 1934 version, which IS totally different; I think the decision to change part of the plot to Marrakesh really added an exotic quality.

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10 best remakes: The Man Who Knew Too Much

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The 10 Best Remakes (from Ask Men .com)

Ah, the remake. Embraced by some, loathed by others. For every decent remake to come down the pike, there are at least another half-dozen mediocre examples waiting around the corner (i.e. 2005's Guess Who and Assault on Precinct 13). Remakes that are actually able to top their predecessors are few and far between, so we've gone ahead and done all the legwork for you.

Below are the 10 best remakes, with the sole criteria being that each film must have been inspired by another film (straight-to-video and made-for-television releases don't count). And don't go looking for any sissy remakes like The Parent Trap or Little Women; this is guy territory, pure and simple.

Number 10

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The Man Who Knew Too Much (1956)

A number of filmmakers have remade their own films with little success (such as George Sluizer with The Vanishing and Takashi Shimizu with The Grudge); the most obvious and notable exception to this rule is Alfred Hitchcock.

While the 1934 The Man Who Knew Too Much is an expectedly effective and fast-paced thriller, Hitch outdid himself with the '56 retelling. Featuring a fantastic lead performance by Jimmy Stewart and some jaw-dropping moments of directorial virtuosity, the film remains one of the legendary's filmmaker's most memorable efforts.

Stewart stars as Ben McKenna, a doctor who finds himself embroiled in an assassination plot while traveling through Africa with his family. Costarring Doris Day as Ben's wife and featuring a typically extravagant Bernard Herrmann score, The Man Who Knew Too Much remains a prototypical example of a truly great adventure/espionage movie, and has since gone on to influence such contemporary examples of the genre as The Bourne Identity, Mission: Impossible and Enemy of the State.

Best quote: "Don't you realize that Americans dislike having their children stolen?"
-The Ambassador

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Unread post by Debbi Austen »

I saw this wonderful film for the first time yesterday. I love Hitchcock and to see Doris in this wonderful role was a double pleasure. This is one of the films that proves that Doris Day was an all around good actress, and could do drama and suspense as well as comedy. Why didn't she get an oscar for this?

Hitch is usually in his films as a non speaking extra. I missed it if he appeared in this film.

I had seen clips of this film, her screaming and singing Que Sera, Sera loudly and dramatically. When I saw her singing in the context of the film, I realized one of the reasons this song was such a big hit.

I liked the part where their friends had waited all day for them, and they came home and said, "Sorry it took so long. We had to pick up our son."
The Doris Day Show

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Hitch appeared in TMWNTM

Unread post by Peter Flapper »

Hi Debbi,

I believe Hitch is standing by a busstop in the beginning of the movie. I'll check this out for you.

Peter

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The Man Who Knew Too much

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This was one of Hitchcock's 'seven lost films' - films that were withdrawn for legal/ownership reasons for many years. They included ROPE, THE TROUBLE WITH HARRY, VERTIGO and REAR WINDOW.

"The Man Who Knew Too Much" was re-released in the mid-eighties and I remember seeing it for the first time in a London cinema - the part where Doris sang "Que Sera, Sera" (loud enough for her kidnapped son on the top floor to hear) jarred with me, I remember. It sounded like she was murdering the song that she normally sung so sweetly!

Apart from that I really enjoyed it. It's not quite up there with Hitchcock's best, like "Rear Window" and "North by Northwest" - Ralph often talks about Doris letting 'Doris Day' slip into the role she was playing and I think this is a case of that. It would have been better without any singing and DD's part beefed-up. They obviously thought that Doris playing an ex-singer and given a hit song to record would boost the film's popularity. I see that as a commercial decision that didn't really help the film. Would she have done the same if she was in "Rear Window?" I can hear the studio saying "Let's have her looking out the window and singing "I Speak to the Stars", or something.

I was into photography then and I was clicking away with my zoom lens and got some great shots from the film - Which i must share when I have some time.

Alfred Hitchcock : A Life in Darkness and Light has a chapter on the film with interesting stuff about Doris:

http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/006039 ... s&n=283155
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Unread post by Debbi Austen »

I remember reading Ralph saying that Doris slipped into the role of Candy Williams in Love Me or Leave Me when she was on the phone. I have watched TMTKTM serveral times now and didn't see were she slipped out of character.

I recently read that Hitchcock always wanted Doris in the role of Jo McKenna. The studio execs had their doubts that Day could handle the dramatic scenes. To support his choice, Hitchcock cited Day's role in Storm Warning as a Klansman's wife.

I found Hitch's cameo, it is when they are in the market place, watching the acrobats. (His back is facing the camera).

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The Doris Day Show

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Hitchcock wanted Doris in the role

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I recently read that Hitchcock always wanted Doris in the role of Jo McKenna.
Actually, according to the book I mentioned, Hitchcock wanted Grace Kelly, who turned out to be unavailable and had to take Doris as part of a package to get James Stewart. But he was very happy with Doris and the work she did in the film.
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Peter Flapper
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Photo's of The Man Who Knew Too Much

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Hi again,

Found this site with photo's of this wonderfull flm.

http://www.hitchcockmania.it/filmografi ... tofilm.htm

Peter

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Doris in England

Unread post by Jas1 »

Isn't it kind of strange (but nice) to see the all American Miss Day in a so typical English street in one of the photos?

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Ralph
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Music In Hitchocock's Films

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Hitchcock, Thrilling the Ears as well as The Eyes
Excerp from New York Times, Jan 8, 2007

The 1956 remake of “The Man Who Knew Too Much” uses Arthur Benjamin’s “Storm Clouds” cantata, which was commissioned for the 1934 version of the film. In the remake an assassination is to take place at a climactic cymbal crash. The bad guys, here as elsewhere in Hitchcock’s works, are surprisingly musically literate. They play recordings for the assassin. They supply a score reader who follows along as Herrmann conducts the London Symphony Orchestra. And in the remake, Mr. Sullivan points out, the musical emphasis is heightened from the beginning.

The heroine’s musical past becomes crucial. Doris Day’s professionally trained voice thwarts the assassination with her anticipatory scream. Music’s powers even help her find her kidnapped child as she sings his favorite song, “Que Sera, Sera.”

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another great movie

Unread post by Natalier »

This is another great movie. I dont know what it is about the movie I liked, I know it isnt the bit when hank gets kidnapped. I think its when the little boy and Doris sing together its so sweet.
Its a great feeling

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great movie

Unread post by suzie »

I gave the man who knew to much an exellent rating.Wow talk about keeping you on the edge of your seat !! (JULIE did that to me as well.)Who says doris day is not a serious actress?As far as im concerned shes one of the best to ever grace hollywood.
The film going world could use a few more just like her.Doris is VERY PROFESSIONAL.I have seen this movie many times and it still keeps my attention throuhout. :shock: suspencful
suzie

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Unread post by dayniac »

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Well - I love this movie. To me you can't compare it to the 30's version. I think Doris is great in this part. And from what I've read Hitchcock thought she was good too.
Here's a fun picture of a fan taking a picture of DD on the street when she wasn't on camera.

Toni

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Unread post by dayniac »

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And I think that Jimmy and DD got along very well. You've probably seen this - but here they are during a break Jan. 1956.

Toni

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Unread post by dayniac »

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In Considering Doris I just read his opinion of this movie. He thought it was a good movie and that Doris was great in it. I agree. The scene -after their son is kidnapped and Jimmy gives her the sedative - is fantastic ! She goes through each emotion in such a true fashion I forget that this is a movie ! Santopietro stated that with that scene alone she deserved an oscar nomination - I agree - of course she didn't get one !!
She was definitely cheated in that department ! Should have gotten one for LMOLM and TMWKTM. .... in my opinion anyway !
I thought she was great in this movie !!

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Unread post by Heatherlicious »

I just bought the DVD yesterday at Borders for us to watch this weekend, though my dad, like most old movies I watch, almost gave it all away for me. :P I can't wait to finally see it.
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Unread post by Heatherlicious »

Oh my dad loves Doris, he had the biggest crush on her, and of course my mother idolizes her, so I get it honest. :P

For LCB, I was making my friend watch it with me and my mom and he comes up and basically gave it all away before we got 5 minutes in. :P Silly dad.

Thanks for the documentary, I will definitely watch that tomorrow after the movie, I'm beat tonight!
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