The Man Who Knew Too Much

You are invited to rate and comment on the 39 films of Doris Day.

How do you rate "The Man Who Knew Too Much"?

Poor
0
No votes
Average
1
1%
Good
12
15%
Excellent
65
83%
 
Total votes: 78

User avatar
Johnny
Honorary Member
Posts: 2930
Joined: 10 Oct 2007, 16:02
Location: Toronto, Canada

Re: The Man Who Knew Too Much

Unread post by Johnny »

In David Kaufman's book on Doris there are some excellent insights from Doris while working on The Man Who Knew Too Much:

"Doris became quite blunt with another reporter when she described seeing herself in the picture. " In some of the terror scenes I look just awful. My mouth was crooked, my hair was all mussed, my eyes were swollen, my dress was like a sack. If I had seen the rushes of that, -- well, I'll tell you one thing. I'd have marched into Hitchcock and told him that he was ruining me". " Day explained that she understood her character was "supposed to look awful_...But me personally I don't like seeing myself looking like that. As I say , if I had seen the rushes, the next time we played such a scene I'd have settled my dress, combed my hair and kept my mouth straight. Consciously or subconsciously I'd be trying to make me, Doris Day, look pretty instead of making that woman look real". Day continued , inadvertently referring to Method acting again. "So I don't look at the rushes. As long as it's a picture about that woman, I keep myself out of it."


In a related comment, Hollywood's legendary costume designer Edith Head complimented Day for having "a natural flair for style" and being the "easiest star" she had ever worked with-- all the more impressive considering that, during her extensive reign in Hollywood , Head had worked with practically every one of the great stars. "But designing her costumes for "The Man Who Knew Too Much" was difficult. I had to make her reasonably drab, and it was hard work added Head, describing a costumer's typical lament.

But both Hitchcock and Head knew exactly what they were doing with Day. As Paramount executive Don Hartman wrote to fellow executive Russell Holman in a telegram of October 11, 1955: " Ran The Man Who Knew Too Much " today in rough form without dubbing and scoring and think it is one of Hitchcock's and Jimmy Stewart's best pictures. Doris Day is every bit as good as in "Live Me or Leave Me", ...I prophecy now with safety that this is another in the long list of Paramount smash hits".


Edith Head's comments is another testimonial on the ease in working with Doris and must be added to a long list of Doris' cast and crew in numerous films. This speaks to Doris' professionalism and her personal character.
Johnny

User avatar
jmichael
Honorary Member
Posts: 1918
Joined: 23 Apr 2005, 06:00
Location: Overland Park, KS USA

Re: The Man Who Knew Too Much

Unread post by jmichael »

Quite a contrast to Kim Novak who objected to the similar gray suit she wore in Vertigo. Novak went to Hitchcock in protest but he held film because his vision of the film was detailed and non-negotiable.

I love how Doris described her reaction to seeing herself onscreen. She's right - the actor has to separate from the character and she was wise to avoid watching the rushes. She says "that woman" and "I keep myself out of it." I love that. It was very shrewd on her part.

Johnny, thanks for posting so many fascinating stories about her films. These are great fun to discuss.

Michael
Michael H

"There's nothing in my bedroom that bothers me."

User avatar
Johnny
Honorary Member
Posts: 2930
Joined: 10 Oct 2007, 16:02
Location: Toronto, Canada

Re: The Man Who Knew Too Much

Unread post by Johnny »

Thanks Michael!

I have found Doris Day endlessly fascinating on so many fronts. As I have posted before, Doris Day songs and films were always part of my childhood. My very first trip to the movies was seeing On Moonlight Bay. I definitely identified with Wesley (Billy Gray), but Doris‘ smile and voice made an indelible impression on me. When I saw Calamity Jane I remember my dad saying Doris was a really beautiful and talented girl .

As a teen I became interested in film reviews and took notice of how Doris was criticized in Do Not Disturb. Always being a advocate for the underdog, (which directed me into the field of social work), I took umbrage with the criticism of Doris but not necessarily the film. Doris never gave a poor performance.

Reading Doris Day: Her Own Story, increased my interest
further. I was so impressed with her ability to overcome some many hurtful situations and her work in animal advocacy. It occurred to me that she had a really well developed sense of spiritual consciousness that helped her not succumb to bitterness and blame. She channeled her energy into positive endeavours. I loved her humility and kind nature.

Over the years Doris’ music has soothed difficult times.
I treasure her music and films and writing about her gives me great happiness. Like all the people we loved who have passed on and we remember with affection, I believe Doris Day should not be forgotten as an artist and as a person.

I am so thankful we have the Doris Day Forum to celebrate her life and memory. I love reading forum members posts and seeing Doris photos. It is clear Doris has played important role for everyone.

Again it is important to sincerely thank Bryan for continuing to keep this valuable forum going for Doris and for us. It is deeply appreciated.
Johnny

User avatar
Peter Flapper
Honorary Member
Posts: 1899
Joined: 05 Mar 2005, 04:01
Location: The Netherlands
Contact:

Re: The Man Who Knew Too Much

Unread post by Peter Flapper »

Hi Johnny,

Great posts Johnny, all thoughfully researched and narrated by you.
A Job very well done. Hope you will continue for a long long time.
Thank you so much for doing this priceless topics.

P

Post Reply

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest