Lucky Me

You are invited to rate and comment on the 39 films of Doris Day.

How do you rate "Lucky Me"?

Poor
2
4%
Average
20
35%
Good
22
39%
Excellent
13
23%
 
Total votes: 57

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Johnny
Honorary Member
Posts: 2874
Joined: 10 Oct 2007, 16:02
Location: Toronto, Canada

Re: Lucky Me

Unread post by Johnny »

Hi Bryan and Peter,

I watched Lucky Me near St. Patrick's Day and I too have always enjoyed the enthusiastic opening scene with Doris skipping down the street. Doris radiates joy. The strong supporting cast is really funny. Bryan, I think as you do, Lucky Me takes on a deeper meaning since Doris has left in body but not in spirit.

Peter, I agree with you regarding Robert Cummings as a leading man. Doris' strong personality needs a stronger leading man that can match her bright wit and confidence. Some of strongest leading men that were a good match for Doris were Danny Thomas, Howard Keel, Steve Cochran, James Cagney, James Stewart, John Raitt, Clark Gable, Rock Hudson, James Garner, Stephen Boyd, Rod Taylor and Brian Keith.

Some thoughts on Doris' leading men:

The leading men that worked out well for Doris and the films were Jack Carson, Dennis Morgan, Gordon Mac Rae, Gene Nelson, Frank Sinatra, ,Jack Lemmon, David Niven and Peter Graves.

The leading men in Doris Day films that were miscast and were not good matches for Doris were Kirk Douglas, Ray Bolger, Ronald Reagan, Robert Cummings, Louis Jordan, Richard Widmark, Rex Harrison, Cary Grant (who should have been cast in the lead in Midnight Lace -- he would have been terrific as the male lead in Please Don't Eat The Daises ), Richard Harris and Robert Morse.

Gregory Peck would have been a good choice as the lead in Young Man With A Horn as well as The Winning Team.

Errol Flynn would have been an interesting choice as the lead in April In Paris. He would have made a good romantic match for Doris.

I would have liked to see Montgomery Clift in the Louis Jordan role in Julie. He had the intensity as well as the subtlety to give a strong performance. Paul Newman would have been effective.

Jack Lemmon would have been a better choice in the Richard Widmark role in the Tunnel of Love. Glenn Ford was the original choice.

William Holden or Glenn Ford would have had a better chemistry with Doris than Richard Harris in Caprice.

Jack Lemmon would have been great in the Robert Morse role in Where Were You When The Lights Went Out.

Although some of these scripts were admittedly weak, the films may have been stronger with better leading men casting who had better chemistry with Doris..
Johnny

User avatar
Johnny
Honorary Member
Posts: 2874
Joined: 10 Oct 2007, 16:02
Location: Toronto, Canada

Re: Lucky Me

Unread post by Johnny »

This is some information on Lucky Me is from the TCM website:


"When Warner Brothers pushed Doris to start work on Lucky Me, she was not well and kept putting the project off. She was also disappointed with the script and found it to be below the standard of her usual productions. Robert Cummings, Phil Silvers, Nancy Walker, Eddie Got Jr. we're all talented funny people she said, "but I knew by now that no amount of talent could overcome an inferior script, especially if it is a comedy".

Day seriously considered taking a suspension from the studio rather than make Lucky Me. It was a common practice for actors to who didn't want to appear in a film they believed was inferior. A close friend of Day's talked her out of abandoning the picture commitment. Day agreed and made the decision to give Lucky Me her very best effort, no matter what.


Although it is impossible to tell from just watching Lucky Me was not an easy film for Day to make. "Whereas I had always been able to get into the part with effortless vitality", she said, " now it was all I could do to get myself up to the performing level". She tried to rest as much as possible and not exhaust hetself in an effort to keep the panic attacks at bay." I attempted to do this by resting in my dressing room as much as I could , avoiding all interviews, and closing the set to visitors." She said, " Some days if the shooting schedule was too long, I asked the director to shorten it. Judy Garland was on the lot at the same time making A Star is Born(1954); she was being difficult and erratic about her hours and the press lumped us together as the Warner Bros. prima donnas. I tried not to let that bother me. My primary obligation was to keep myself well enough to finish the picture. Nothing else really mattered"

It appears this fundamental belief, "a deal is a deal" remained true in the late sixties when she made Do Not Disturb, Caprice and Where Were You When The Lights Went Out.


As another Doris Day Forum member wrote, some of the Doris Day film scripts were inferior but Doris' performances never were.
Johnny

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