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Re: The Glass Bottom Boat

Posted: 12 Nov 2018, 23:16
by Johnny
Thanks Musiclover!
Sorry about this.

The quotes are now included.

Re: The Glass Bottom Boat

Posted: 13 Nov 2018, 08:56
by jmichael
I think Gelb could have been more generous in his remarks.

GBB is a feature length cartoon with real life characters chasing, foiling and outmaneuvering one another in a string of far fetched situations. Director Frank Tashlin excelled at physical comedy and he was known for his provocative visuals. Can anyone possibly forget Jayne Mansfield walking past the milkman in The Girl Can't Help It? Tashlin was also a satirist who loved to poke fun at middle American values and pop culture trends. His background in cartoon animation made him a natural to helm a screwball comedy about America's obsession with spy movies and television series like James Bond and The Man From Uncle. And he found a deft partner in Doris Day who had a gift for making absurd situations believable.

Granted, the storyline is thin and the whole Gizmo thing belongs in a Saturday morning Buck Rogers serial but audiences lapped it up because of Doris Day, Tashlin's direction and the outstanding cast of supporting players. No one disappoints here. I'm glad Doris found one solid comedic romp before she descended into the likes of Where Were You When The Lights Went Out and The Ballad Of Josie.

I give this one 3.5 out of 4.0 stars.

Michael

Re: The Glass Bottom Boat

Posted: 13 Nov 2018, 09:36
by Johnny
Michael, I agree with you that Gelb could have been more generous in his review of The Glass Bottom Boat.
Many of his criticisms of Doris' films are not directed at Doris but at the screenplays, direction and some of Doris's co-stars. I do like his historical references to the work of the screenwriters and directors. There are many interesting kernels of information.
I saw The Glass Bottom Boat with my father on a sunny afternoon at the Odeon theater in Kingston Ontario. I recall him laughing out loud in the theater, something he rarely did. When we left the theater, he said as he had many times before, Doris Day never disappoints. He loved Doris Day movies and music and really appreciated her talent.

For these golden memories, I will always love The Glass Bottom Boat. It is a funny, charming film.

Re: The Glass Bottom Boat

Posted: 13 Nov 2018, 10:07
by jmichael
Love that story about your father, Johnny. I also appreciate the time and energy you put into creating new topics and keeping the discussion going in a lively and informative manner. Kudos to you for all this and much more.

I am actually quite fond of Gelb's book. I bought it years ago and reread it occasionally after watching one of her films.

Michael

Re: The Glass Bottom Boat

Posted: 13 Nov 2018, 21:25
by Musiclover
Appreciate your adding the quote marks, Johnny. I like this film and wanted to be sure it was Gelb's review, not yours, that we were seeing because it does not seem consistent with your usual complimentary style that is so refreshing.

Re: The Glass Bottom Boat

Posted: 15 Nov 2019, 16:49
by Johnny
I came across this article in Wikipedia regarding the reception of Doris' film The Glass Bottom Boat.

"The film was an attempt to appeal both to Day's traditional fans and to a younger audience. It was a success financially, earning $4,320,000 in North America rentals by the end of 1966.

It drew 21, 752 admissions in France.
On Rotton Tomatoes, the film holds a critical approval of 50%, based on 6 reviews with an average rating of 5.6/10.

Day followed up with Caprice ,(1967), a comedy-thriller more completely in the spy spoof genre, again with Tashlin directing, but it was a critical and commercial failure."

Re: The Glass Bottom Boat

Posted: 16 Nov 2019, 11:14
by jmichael
It's sad to think how Rosenthal reduced Marty to a bowl of quivering jello and her impeccable film career became the sacrificial lamb. No more the shrewd moves of a producer, husband, agent who encouraged Doris to accept challenging films like Love Me Or Leave Me or The Man Who Knew Too Much. Marty was just trying to keep them above water while Rosenthal was bilked them out of every cent they owned.

On the plus side, GBB holds up well today and it was a much better film than Do Not Disturb.

Michael

Re: The Glass Bottom Boat

Posted: 18 Nov 2019, 12:59
by webmaster
Both Do Not Disturb and Caprice were really lightweight films and quite artificial, compared even to some of her early Warner Bros films. The Ballad of Josie and Where Were You When the Lights Went Out? weren't great either. I suppose a plot can sound better on paper but Marty really made some poor choices towards the end and, as you say, Michael, brought her film career to a close. Que Sera, Sera.

Luckily the majority of her films are still worth watching. :)