Great interview

Talking about and listening to Doris Day, the singer.
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dorisdayicon
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Great interview

Unread post by dorisdayicon »

This is an excerpt from JazzWax interview with Ronnell Bright

Ronnell's achievements as a jazz pianist, accompanist and composer are extraordinary. But with enormous accomplishment comes deep disappointment, especially if you were part of the competitive West Coast popular music scene in the 1960s and 1970s.

Today in the fifth and final installment of my weeklong conversation with Ronnell, he talks candidly about golden opportunities that never materialized with Barbra Streisand and Doris Day, and why he ultimately decided to take Louis Armstrong's advice:


He talks glowingly about Doris and there are a lot of nice pictures of Doris, although none new to us.

http://www.jazzwax.com/2008/04/interview-ron-4.html

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jmichael
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Unread post by jmichael »

Velda,

Thanks so much for posting this terrific article. I had never heard of him before and now I see that he played and worked with some great jazz vocalists. I really enjoyed reading how much he respected Doris as an artist. His remarks about her singing remind us again just how good and underrated she was. One thing I noticed though is neither Doris nor Streisand come off well based on his descriptions of his brief encounter with both of them. The bit about Streisand and Jon Peters does not surprise me at all. But I had never heard Doris described as "pompous" before; quite the contrary, based on nearly every account that I've read. Perhaps she was just being guarded around him.

His stories ring true though and they point out just how ruthless the entertainment business is and how much influence managers, agents, and producers have over their clients.

Michael H

John M
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Unread post by John M »

Great interview. Thanks Velda!

Having worked for Jon Peters for years, I didn't think he or Barbra came off that badly. She was obviously very upset about something and that was not the moment to plug a song, nor was it the professional way to do it. I know people think that happens all the time in the business, but the reality is, you won't be taken too seriously if you don't go through proper channels. I actually loved Barbra saying to her, "What, you write your own songs and just carry tapes around all the time?" :lol: I'm surprised Barbra even took the envelope, but she was in a vulnerable position I guess: when someone is crying and trying not to be seen, you won't score any points by stopping them and trying to get them to do business with you at that moment. :?
"I wouldn't bring up Paris if I were you. It's poor salesmanship."
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dorisdayicon
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Unread post by dorisdayicon »

You are both right. The agents and managers have a lot of influence. I think Doris reacted the way she did because she was given the wrong message. Whereby she thought Ronnell Bright didn't want to work with her, he wasn't comfortable with her accompanist. It had nothing to do with Doris for whom Bright had the greatest respect. Due to a misunderstanding we were all deprived of a potentially wonderful musical collaboration.
As far as Barbra is concerned, you are right John, the timing was bad, but in this highly competetive business you take your breaks where you can.
Anyway, this interview shows how highly regarded Doris was among musicians, something that the critics should acknowledge. But, some of thwem rather stick to their stereotypes of Doris. Everybody's loss.

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Unread post by Jas1 »

I enjoyed reading the interview very much, thanks for posting. Never knew of the Sarah Vaughan album either 'Close to you' - must do some searching!

joe
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Ronnell Bright interview

Unread post by joe »

What I found surprising and interesting was that Doris was recording The Love Album "live".

I thought she preferred to have the orchestra lay down their tracks first and then, when she felt she was ready, Doris would record her vocals.

This album was recorded in 1967 after her Columia recording contract had expired. It would be interesting to know how they planned to distribute this album which apparently they, the Melchers, financed themselves. Also, it sounded like Doris was thinking of doing another album. Melcher died in 1968 and the Love Album tapes were misplaced due to the turmoil his death created.

Also curious is Bright's claim that Doris was "powdering her nose". I thought Doris didn't do makeup when she wasn't before the cameras.

It certainly was a pleasure to read that he ranked Doris as equals to Sarah, Ella, etc.

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Unread post by Theodomus »

I thought she preferred to have the orchestra lay down their tracks first
Didn't she say in her birthday interview that she recorded with everybody being in the studio at the same time?

Or was that just in her early years of recording?
Marion

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Unread post by Peter Flapper »

Hi Marion,

That's what she said in the birthday show. I also read somewhere that the album: "Annie get your gun" was done without live orchestra and that Doris found it very difficult to work that way. She sang only with a piano and the orchestra was added later. She didn't like it that way. She was in one part of the country and Robert Goulet was in the other part.

P

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Unread post by John M »

In her book, Doris said that during the height of her movie career, she sometimes had to record w/o the orchestra. And though she liked the convenience of being able to record when she thought she was in best voice, she felt that all singers, including her, do their best work when singing live with the orchestra.
"I wouldn't bring up Paris if I were you. It's poor salesmanship."
- Rick Blaine, Casablanca

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Unread post by Theodomus »

Thanks guys, I thought so. :-)
Marion

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