News, Events and Comment

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Musiclover
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Re: News, Events and Comment

Unread post by Musiclover » 28 Dec 2017, 04:07

Michael's and Howard's comments about seeing the video of Doris singing live at the Oscar ceremony reminded me that she had been accustomed to singing before much larger audiences at venues (such as the Hollywood Palladium and the Hotel Pennsylvania, to name just two) which attracted capacity crowds in the thousands.
Last week I came across a book published by the Smithsonian Institution about music history. It says, "Doris Day, perhaps the most gifted of all, was the last of the truly great movie musical singers." I think that performance at the Oscar ceremony was a wonderful peek at what was in store for film audiences.

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Re: News, Events and Comment

Unread post by Peter Flapper » 28 Dec 2017, 04:39

Hi Judy,

What a great compliment from The Smithsonian Institution:
"Doris Day, perhaps the most gifted of all, was the last of the truly great movie musical singers"
Thanks for sharing it!

P

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Re: News, Events and Comment

Unread post by jmichael » 28 Dec 2017, 09:12

Musiclover wrote:
28 Dec 2017, 04:07
Michael's and Howard's comments about seeing the video of Doris singing live at the Oscar ceremony reminded me that she had been accustomed to singing before much larger audiences at venues (such as the Hollywood Palladium and the Hotel Pennsylvania, to name just two) which attracted capacity crowds in the thousands.
Last week I came across a book published by the Smithsonian Institution about music history. It says, "Doris Day, perhaps the most gifted of all, was the last of the truly great movie musical singers." I think that performance at the Oscar ceremony was a wonderful peek at what was in store for film audiences.
What a fabulous quote. Thank you Judy for posting it here.

I've said this many times before but Doris was so naturally good that people took her for granted. When you look back now or compare her with current female stars, who can touch her? Yes, there are good actresses who can sing (Emily Blunt, Kristen Chenoweth, Michelle Pfeiffer, to name a few), but we haven't had anyone who mastered the musical comedy genre the way Doris did or headlined a dramatic musical biography at the level of Love Me Or Leave Me. I suppose you could argue that Streisand achieved that with her Oscar winning turn as Fanny Brice in Funny Girl and her dramatic musical Yentl. But aside from Streisand and maybe Julie Andrews, I can't think of another film actress who had the talent, the charisma, the acting skill or the voice to carry a big screen musical on her shoulders. This is why I think the Academy should award her a Special Oscar whether she shows up to accept it or not. Let her turn it down - they can put it on a shelf somewhere until she claims it.

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Re: News, Events and Comment

Unread post by webmaster » 28 Dec 2017, 10:04

But aside from Streisand and maybe Julie Andrews, I can't think of another film actress who had the talent, the charisma, the acting skill or the voice to carry a big screen musical on her shoulders.
Em... (cough) Aren't you forgetting Marilyn Monroe, Judy Garland, Shirley Jones, Liza Minelli, Ginger Rogers, Betty Grable, Mitzi Gaynor, Jane Powell, Katherine Grayson, etc, etc? :)
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Re: News, Events and Comment

Unread post by jmichael » 28 Dec 2017, 10:37

No, I am not.

And here we go.....

MM - no one like her and the most iconic movie star of all time but not nearly the singer or dancer DD was.

JG - vocally equal to and perhaps superior to Doris in some respects but she never achieved the level of film superstardom or box-office clout that Doris did. She was however a superb dramatic actress and her performances in films like Meet Me In St. Lous, Wizard Of Oz, and A Star Is Born are untouchable.

SJ - you must be kidding.

LM - aside from Cabaret and her appealing kookiness in films like Julie Moon, Liza was never a huge movie star.

GR - a great dancer and dramatic actress but she was not nearly the singer Doris was.

BG - very popular, winning star personality and WW2 Pin-Up but not nearly the comedic or dramatic actress Doris was.

MG - You must be kidding, part two. Please watch For Love Or Money again and report back to me. Ditto, South Pacific. LOL

JP - a great near operatic singing voice but again not a huge movie star IMO.

KG - another great, nearly operatic singing voice who didn't achieve a fraction of DD's popularity or box-office success.

Bailiff, please escort the witness from the stand. LOL

Oh, let me get this one out of the way right now - Debbie Reynolds, who was another triple threat but she could not touch Doris as a singer or dramatic actress.

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Re: News, Events and Comment

Unread post by webmaster » 28 Dec 2017, 10:52

Yes but all of them still starred in big musicals or as you put it, carried the musical on their shoulders, didn't they? To a greater or lesser extent, depending on your point of view.
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Re: News, Events and Comment

Unread post by jmichael » 28 Dec 2017, 18:07

All of them starred in successful musicals but (IMO) only Doris, Judy, Marilyn and Barbra reached icon status in terms of
boxoffice, versatility, name recognition, critical acclaim and longevity. Although they are very talented ladies, I wouldn’t put Shirley Jones, Mitzi Gaynor, Jane Powell or Kathryn Grayson at the same level of stardom or influence in the industry. Betty Grable was Number One at the Boxoffice for a while, but she didn’t have a notable recording career or get much in the way of critical acclaim. Liza had success in films but it was short lived and she was never a huge Boxoffice draw or a major recording star. Ginger Rogers? Maybe - she was certainly popular, talented and versatile and her name recognition is huge. But did she have a successful recording career or have the same kind of long lasting impact as Day, Garland, Streisand or Monroe? No, I don’t think so.

Granted, this is somewhat subjective and we all have our favorites, but Doris ranks alongside Streisand, Garland, and Monroe (who was a passable singer at best and never a huge recording star) when it comes to superstardom. Again, IMO, ahem...

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Re: News, Events and Comment

Unread post by webmaster » 28 Dec 2017, 19:20

I accept everything you say, Michael. We're probably coming at it from different positions. I've always loved musicals - rare amongst my friends, apart from one person. We used to share a house and he was always getting me to watch old musicals, his favorites being Easter Parade and Show Boat, neither of which I was keen on at the time. I saw him last week and we talked about us watching old films together and he said, "You'll have to come over and we can watch Meet Me in Saint Louis." I'll have to have a stiff drink or two!) :) But I remember watching Lucky Me, Love Me or Leave Me, Calamity Jane, Jumbo, etc, and he always loved Doris Day films;

Where I'm coming from is Doris is great and I love her musicals but don't forget all the other people. 8)

Which I'm sure you don't as I know you are a great film lover.

I saw the new Star Wars yesterday - I enjoyed it, it was a bit long at 2.35 hrs but I wouldn's put off anyone seeing it as it takes you back (not totally) to when you saw the first one - if you did.
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Re: News, Events and Comment

Unread post by doris-day-fan » 28 Dec 2017, 22:31

Just heard the sad news that Rose Marie died today at age 94... RIP ROSE MARIE.
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Re: News, Events and Comment

Unread post by jmichael » 29 Dec 2017, 00:20

doris-day-fan wrote:
28 Dec 2017, 22:31
Just heard the sad news that Rose Marie died today at age 94... RIP ROSE MARIE.
Very sad indeed. I just saw her a month ago in LA at the screening of her documentary “Wait For Your Laugh.” She was in a wheelchair and on oxygen but very sharp and animated in her comments. She was also thrilled with the overwhelming response the film received because she was finally getting the recognition she deserved. I am so pleased that she lived long enough to feel the love from her fans and the public. 👏🏻 😢

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Re: News, Events and Comment

Unread post by Peter Flapper » 29 Dec 2017, 03:50

So sad to hear this news. RIP Rose Marie!

P

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Re: News, Events and Comment

Unread post by Johnny » 29 Dec 2017, 11:46

The passing of Rose Marie is a milestone in the loss of another bright light of joy in our world.

Her work as Sally Rogers on The Dick Van Dyke Show and Myrna on The Doris Day Show brought sparkle and laughter to these series.

Interestingly she was known by her first name Rose Marie long before Cher, Madonna, or Bono.

Let us be thankful for Rose Marie's beautiful talent she generously shared with us.
Johnny

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Re: News, Events and Comment

Unread post by Peter Flapper » 14 Jan 2018, 15:09

Hi all,

Came across an online magazine with some information on Dennis LeVett and the Cypress Inn. I think it might be interesting. So the link is below.
https://issuu.com/65-57-degree/docs/65.spring12
2012 Spring - article starts on page 24-25

P

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Re: News, Events and Comment

Unread post by Jas1 » 15 Jan 2018, 06:31

Michael - I would agree with your comments re the greats. :wink:

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Re: News, Events and Comment

Unread post by Johnny » 17 Jan 2018, 13:42

Tonight (Wednesday - January 17th), Midnight Lace is showing on Turner Classic Movies. I am interested in what is said if there is an introduction to the film.

Midnight Lace is rarely shown on TCM. There is always something different to appreciate.
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Re: News, Events and Comment

Unread post by webmaster » 18 Jan 2018, 06:40

Doris Day music therapy for Alzheimer's and dementia

Image

I heard a health professional on the TV say they were using music to help people remember memories from early lives and that Doris Day was very popular. I did a quick search online and discovered it backed up in many places:
"Their voices were wispy with age, but the eight group members sang with purpose, remembering every word of the Doris Day classic without prompting. “We were sailing along, on Moonlight Bay. We could hear the voices ringing . . .,” they sang.
"Reminiscence music is different for everyone. Music by The Beatles, Crosby, Stills and Nash, the Moody Blues and other groups of that era cause all sorts of memories to flood into my head. But sometimes so does a song by Frank Sinatra, or even Doris Day can do the trick. I can remember specifically once sitting at the kitchen table while my mom was washing the dishes, listening to Doris Day sing Que Sera, Sera. I couldn’t have been more than six years old."
Image
Ms. Kelly asked Grace Sullivan, 102, if she would like some music. “Something sweet and low,” Mrs. Sullivan replied. Ms. Kelly sang her “Que Sera, Sera (Whatever Will Be, Will Be),” as performed in 1956 by Doris Day. Photo: Jeenah Moon for The New York Times
"She and other music therapists working in end-of-life care often play music from when their clients were young, to help transport them back to a time when they were able-bodied. Mrs. Sullivan, who was in a wheelchair, responded to “Que Sera, Sera” by sighing in rhythm to the music. Ms. Kelly started sighing too, to reflect back to her feelings and deepen them." “How do you feel, Grace?” she asked afterward. “Good, I feel good,” she said.
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Re: News, Events and Comment

Unread post by Johnny » 18 Jan 2018, 09:26

Working with individuals with Down Syndrome who often experience dementia in their fifties and sixties, music serves as a soothing and calming support.

One fellow often asked for Doris Day singing On Moonlight Bay or Secret Love. We would sing one of these songs together every Friday and have a conversation about Doris Day. His support team informed me that Fridays were his best days in the week. This same support was given to him in his home environment.

I introduced Doris Day movies to the staff team (who did not know Doris' work), to show the individuals in the program. Thursdays movie days became very popular and Doris Day musical movies were requested more often than others.
Calamity Jane, On Moonlight Bay and Billy Rose's Jumbo were the top favorites. (Everyone knew Doris' song Que Sera, Que Sera).

My own theory is the emotional intelligence and sincerity in Doris' singing really connects with everyone. She has given us the gifts of intimacy, kindness and warmth in her work.

Thanks Bryan for introducing this important and interesting topic.
Johnny

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Re: News, Events and Comment

Unread post by Jas1 » 19 Jan 2018, 09:42

The scene in the British sit-com - the Royale Family - with the middle aged daughter doing the hair of the old frail mother [roles reversed] with the mother talking about dying and reminiscing about doing the daughter's hair when she was a child - and Doris comes on the radio singing Que Sera - is heart breaking still to me - the old lady starts to sing in , the daughter [from behind joins in rocking the mother - again roles reversed] with tears streaming down - beautiful scene. "when I was just a little girl..."

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Re: News, Events and Comment

Unread post by jmichael » 19 Jan 2018, 12:15

I often wonder if we fully grasp the healing power of music. Hope they pursue this further in the interest of helping these folks feel more connected and loved.

Great topic, Bryan.

Michael
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Re: News, Events and Comment

Unread post by howard » 19 Jan 2018, 12:18

Johnny: Ben Mankiewicz' intro to "Midnight Lace" contained one mistake. He stated that after "Midnight Lace," Doris only did comedies. On his face book page, I posted that Doris had starred in the MGM musical, "Billy Rose's Jumbo." Mankiewicz is generally a font of knowledge, always so interesting, but I don't want him making that mistake again.
Like Irene Dunne done.

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Re: News, Events and Comment

Unread post by jmichael » 20 Jan 2018, 07:35

Image

RIP Dorothy Malone.

A good actress who is best remembered for her flamboyant, Oscar winning role as Marylee Hadley in Written On The Wind and as Constance in the television series Peyton Place. Nice to remember her as Doris' sister in Young At Heart. These three looked and felt like sisters, didn't they?

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Re: News, Events and Comment

Unread post by webmaster » 20 Jan 2018, 08:03

Sad news. Great image to remember her by.
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Re: News, Events and Comment

Unread post by Johnny » 20 Jan 2018, 09:57

Like Doris Day, Dorothy Malone worked with Rock Hudson in three film. In addition to her striking Academy award winning role in Written On The Wind, she starred with Rock in The Tarnished Angels as well as the western, The Last Sunset.

One of my favorite Dorothy Malone performances was as the book store employee in The Big Sleep with Humphrey Bogart.
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Re: News, Events and Comment

Unread post by webmaster » 20 Jan 2018, 16:16

New York Times report:

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Dorothy Malone with Rock Hudson in the 1956 movie “Written on the Wind.” Ms. Malone won an Academy Award for her performance.
Dorothy Malone, the sultry blond actress who won an Academy Award for playing an unapologetically bad girl in “Written on the Wind” and found television stardom as a repentant one on “Peyton Place,” died on Friday in Dallas. She was 93.

Her daughter Mimi Vanderstraaten confirmed the death, at an assisted living facility, where Ms. Malone had lived for the last 10 years.

Ms. Malone was 31 and had been in Hollywood for 13 years when she was cast as Marylee Hadley, a spoiled, sex-crazed young Texas oil heiress, in “Written on the Wind” (1956). The film, directed by Douglas Sirk, Hollywood’s master of glossy melodrama, also starred Rock Hudson and Robert Stack.

The three starred again together two years later in Sirk’s drama “Tarnished Angels,” in which a reporter (Mr. Hudson) falls for the sultry wife (Ms. Malone) of a barnstorming pilot (Mr. Stack).

But Ms. Malone’s career appeared to succumb to what some call the Oscar curse. After winning the award, for the best-supporting-actress, she never had as juicy a role again. Seemingly well-chosen follow-up parts — among them the suicidal first wife of Lon Chaney (James Cagney) in “Man of a Thousand Faces” (1957) and the self-destructive daughter of John Barrymore (Errol Flynn) in “Too Much Too Soon” (1958) — did little to advance her career."
Read More:
https://www.nytimes.com/2018/01/19/movi ... at-93.html
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Re: News, Events and Comment

Unread post by Johnny » 21 Jan 2018, 19:44

Valentines Day is coming up on February 14th.

I am wondering what forum members would think about sending valentine cards to Doris this year. I thought this might be a nice surprise for Doris.

If anyone is interested, I will post her Carmel post office mailing address if needed.
Johnny

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